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What the papers say: A Brexit trade deal is in everyone’s interests

21 August 2017

8:40 AM

21 August 2017

8:40 AM

‘It is vital for our future prosperity’, says the Sun, ‘that we cut a trade deal with Brussels’. David Davis was correct then, the paper argues, to ‘call on the EU to start trade talks running “parallel” with our exit talks’. ‘After all, how can we settle our bill until we know what we’ll get in return,’ the paper asks. The Sun goes on to point out that, no matter how much it might wind up ‘EU bosses’, the EU sells us £96bn more than we sell them’. This makes one thing clear: ‘a free trade deal is in their interests too’. ‘EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier has been throwing his weight around’, the paper says. But while you might not know it from his confident approach, this strategy presents a problem for him: ‘he needs our settlement cash’. This gives the UK a ‘decent hand’ to play. All sides would benefit – including the EU – if Michel Barnier finally ‘cottoned on to this’, the paper concludes.

The Times hails the intervention of Judge Carl Baudenbacher, president of the court of the European Free Trade Association (Efta), for a Brexit proposal which the paper suggests could ‘deliver a sensible compromise’. After Brexit, Britain will need a body which oversees ‘cross-border trade disputes’. Instead of setting up a ‘new body’ – or using the European Court of Justice, which is unlikely to warm the hearts of Brexiteers – Baudenbacher suggests using the Efta court. The fact that this court’s rulings don’t ‘trump those of national courts’ makes this a plus, says the Times. And so, too, does the fact that this court already exists – meaning there is no need ‘to build a new court from scratch’. This dodges ‘the daunting task of simultaneously satisfying British Eurosceptics and the EU’s remaining 27 states,’ suggests the Times. At the very least, concludes the Times, Judge Carl Baudenbacher ‘deserves a hearing’.

In the face of the Barcelona terror attack, Spain’s ‘solidarity’ has been impressive, says the Guardian. Yet with at least eight of the terrorists apparently home-grown, this solidarity will soon be tested, predicts the paper. Given the reported links of some of the attackers to Morocco, the Guardian cautions against those who ‘believe there is a link between terror and refugees’. Barcelona ’has a fine record’ in welcoming refugees, the paper says – a receptiveness that is not matched elsewhere in Spain. Now, ‘the precious cohesion of neighbourhoods’ is at stake, the Guardian warns. It’s vital in the face of terror and the ongoing migrant crisis, that this is upheld, suggests the paper.


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