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Osborne gets the post-Budget front pages he hoped for

18 March 2015

11:12 PM

18 March 2015

11:12 PM

If George Osborne’s Budget is going to end up in a mess, it hasn’t done so yet. The worst criticism that the front pages of even hostile newspapers can come up with is that the Chancellor has produced a very political Budget which is hardly a surprise. Most splash on the retail offers in the Budget and the good economic news.
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Some of the front pages have rather creative approaches to the Budget.

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Even front pages such as the i, which foregrounds the politics behind the Budget, still refer to the tax cuts for first-time buyers and savers.

And the most critical front pages, from the Guardian and the Mirror, naturally, are below.

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Even the Guardian carries a quite positive ‘at a glance’ list of the offers that Osborne made to voters. He might be unsurprised that the Mirror didn’t like it, but he might be able to take one overtly critical front page.

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Tomorrow sees the alternative Budget from the Lib Dems, the IFS’ analysis and the Today programme interview with the Chancellor. It was on the Today programme after the Autumn Statement that the 1930s row really flared up. We’ll have to wait a few more hours to see what the big row and takeaway line from the Budget is, but for tonight, the Chancellor seems to have got what he wanted.


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