David Cameron has not had the best of weeks. At home, he is engaged in a mucky fight with the former government aide Dominic Cummings and abroad he is facing defeat in his attempt to stop Jean-Claude Juncker from becoming president of the European Commission. But in the papers today, it is Ed Miliband who has all the problems.

The Guardian splashes on how Labour frontbenchers do not want Miliband to stay on after an election defeat. If this story had appeared in almost any other paper, Miliband’s team could have tried to dismiss it as the price you pay for standing up to Rupert Murdoch or backing Leveson. But with The Guardian, this is much harder to do. Indeed, two members of the shadow Cabinet—Rachel Reeves and Chuka Umunna—have felt obliged to provide on the record quotes to try and damp the story down.

What must worry Labour is how hard media debate about Miliband is making it for anything he and Labour say to cut through. Miliband’s respnse to the Condition of Britain report has been largely overshadowed by the polling triple whammy that he has faced in the past few days with ICM saying he has worse personal ratings than Clegg, Ipsos-Mori that almost half of voters want him replaced as Labour leader and YouGov that more than half of voters don’t think he’s up to the job of being PM. If this is how things are going to be between now and the general election, then it is going to be a long ten months for the Labour leader.

Tags: 2005 general election, David Cameron, Ed Miliband, Elections, Labour, UK politics