This week’s Spectator cover star Nils-Axel Mörner brings some good news to a world
otherwise mired in misery: sea levels are not rising dangerously – and haven’t been for at least 300 years. To many readers this may come as a surprise. After all, are not rising sea levels
– caused, we are given to understand, by melting glaciers and shrinking polar ice – one of the main planks of the IPCC’s argument that we need to act now to ‘combat climate change’?

But where the IPCC’s sea level figures are based on computer ‘projections’, questionable measurements and arbitrary adjustments, Mörner’s are based on extensive field observations. His most
recent trip to Goa in India last month – just like his previous expeditions to Bangladesh and the Maldives – has only served to confirm his long-held view that reports of the world’s
imminent inundation have been greatly exaggerated for ends that have more to do with political activism than science.

Mörner’s views have not endeared him to environmental campaigners or the IPCC establishment. A few years ago, when I mentioned his name in a public debate with George Monbiot, I vividly
remember an audible hissing from sections of the audience as if I’d invoked the equivalent of Lord Voldemort.

The problem for Mörner’s detractors is that, eccentric and outspoken Swedish count though he no doubt is, he also happens to be the world’s pre-eminent expert on sea levels. Besides being
responsible for dozens of peer-reviewed papers on the subject, he was also chairman of INQUA Commission on Sea Level Changes and Coastal Evolution. This means that his findings can not easily be
dismissed as those of a raving ‘climate change denier’.

I have heard Mörner speak many times and his position is not nearly as controversial as it is sometimes made out to be by his detractors. His view is simple: ‘If sea levels really are rising
and islands like Tuvalu and the Maldives are in imminent danger of drowning, where is the physical evidence to support it?’ So far there is none. It is those who claim otherwise who are the true
‘deniers’.

You can read Nils-Axel Mörner’s full cover story in this week’s Spectator, on sale today.

Tags: Climate change, Global Warming, Science