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The Lahore attacks are just the latest atrocity in a war on Christians

28 March 2016

10:18 AM

28 March 2016

10:18 AM

Imagine if correspondents in late 1944 had reported the Battle of the Bulge, but without explaining that it was a turning point in the second world war. Or what if finance reporters had told the story of the AIG meltdown in 2008 without adding that it raised questions about derivatives and sub-prime mortgages that could augur a vast financial implosion?

Most people would say that journalists had failed to provide the proper context to understand the news. Yet that’s routinely what media outlets do when it comes to outbreaks of anti-Christian persecution around the world, which is why the global war on Christians remains the greatest story never told of the early 21st century.

Yesterday, more than 70 people were killed in Lahore in a suicide attack targeted against Christians celebrating Easter. In recent years, too, people around the world have been appalled by images of attacks on churches in Pakistan, where 85 people died when two suicide bombers rushed the Anglican All Saints Church in Peshawar, and in Kenya, where an assault on a Catholic church in Wajir left one dead and two injured.

Those atrocities are indeed appalling, but they cannot truly be understood without being seen as small pieces of a much larger narrative. Consider three points about the landscape of anti-Christian persecution today, as shocking as they are generally unknown. According to the International Society for Human Rights, a secular observatory based in Frankfurt, Germany, 80 per cent of all acts of religious discrimination in the world today are directed at Christians. Statistically speaking, that makes Christians by far the most persecuted religious body on the planet.

According to the Pew Forum, between 2006 and 2010 Christians faced some form of discrimination, either de jure or de facto, in a staggering total of 139 nations, which is almost three-quarters of all the countries on earth. According to the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Massachusetts, an average of 100,000 Christians have been killed in what the centre calls a ‘situation of witness’ each year for the past decade. That works out to 11 Christians killed somewhere in the world every hour, seven days a week and 365 days a year, for reasons related to their faith.

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In effect, the world is witnessing the rise of an entire new generation of Christian martyrs. The carnage is occurring on such a vast scale that it represents not only the most dramatic Christian story of our time, but arguably the premier human rights challenge of this era as well.

To put flesh and blood on those statistics, all one has to do is look around. In Baghdad, Islamic militants stormed the Syriac Catholic cathedral of Our Lady of Salvation on 31 October 2010, killing the two priests celebrating Mass and leaving a total of 58 people dead. Though shocking, the assault was far from unprecedented; of the 65 Christian churches in Baghdad, 40 have been bombed at least once since the beginning of the 2003 US-led invasion.

The effect of this campaign of violence and intimidation has been devastating for Christianity in the country. At the time of the first Gulf War in 1991, Iraq boasted a flourishing Christian population of at least 1.5 million. Today the high-end estimate for the number of Christians left is around 500,000, and realistically many believe it could be as low as 150,000. Most of these Iraqi Christians have gone into exile, but a staggering number have been killed.

India’s northeastern state of Orissa was the scene of the most violent anti-Christian pogrom of the early 21st century. In 2008, a series of riots ended with as many as 500 Christians killed, many hacked to death by machete-wielding Hindu radicals; thousands more were injured and at least 50,000 left homeless. Many Christians fled to hastily prepared displacement camps, where some languished for two years or more.

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An estimated 5,000 Christian homes, along with 350 churches and schools, were destroyed. A Catholic nun, Sister Meena Barwa, was raped during the mayhem, then marched naked and beaten. Police sympathetic to the radicals discouraged the nun from filing a report, and declined to arrest her attackers.

In Burma, members of the Chin and Karen ethnic groups, who are strongly Christian, are considered dissidents by the regime and routinely subjected to imprisonment, torture, forced labour, and murder. In October 2010, the Burmese military launched helicopter strikes in territories where the country’s Christians are concentrated.

A Burmese Air Force source told reporters that the junta had declared these areas ‘black zones’, where military personnel were authorised to attack and kill Christian targets on sight. Though there are no precise counts, thousands of Burmese Christians are believed to have been killed in the offensive.

In Nigeria, the militant Islamic movement ‘Boko Haram’ is held responsible for almost 3,000 deaths since 2009, including 800 fatalities last year alone. The movement has made a speciality out of targeting Christians and their churches, and in some cases they seem determined to drive Christians out altogether from parts of the country.

In December 2011, local Boko Haram spokesmen announced that all Christians in the northern Yobe and Borno states had three days to get out, and followed up with a spate of church bombings on 5 and 6 January 2012, which left at least 26 Christians dead, as well as two separate shooting sprees in which eight more Christians died. In the aftermath, hundreds of Christians fled the area, and many are still displaced. Over Christmas last year, at least 15 Christians are believed to have had their throats cut by Boko Haram assailants.

North Korea is widely considered the most dangerous place in the world to be a Christian, where roughly a quarter of the country’s 200,000 to 400,000 Christians are believed to be living in forced labour camps for their refusal to join the national cult around founder Kim Il Sung. The anti-Christian animus is so strong that people with Christian grandparents are frozen out of the most important jobs — even though Kim Il Sung’s mother was a Presbyterian deaconess. Since the armistice in 1953 that stabilised the division of the peninsula, some 300,000 Christians in North Korea have disappeared and are presumed dead.

As these examples illustrate, anti-Christian violence is hardly limited to a ‘clash of civilisations’ between Christianity and Islam. In truth, Christians face a bewildering variety of threats, with no single enemy and no single strategy best adapted to curb the violence.

Though fellow believers in the West may have special reason for feeling concern, the reality is that no confessional convictions at all are required to justify alarm over this rising tide of anti-Christian animus.

Because the bulk of the globe’s 2.3 billion Christians today are impoverished and live in the developing world, and because they are often members of ethnic, cultural and linguistic minorities, experts regard their treatment as a reliable indicator of a society’s broader record on human rights and dignity. Just as one didn’t have to be Jewish in the 1970s to care about dissident Jews in the Soviet Union, nor black in the 1980s to be outraged by the Apartheid regime in South Africa, one doesn’t have to be Christian today to see the defence of persecuted Christians as a towering priority.

Why are the dimensions of this global war so often overlooked? Aside from the root fact that the victims are largely non-white and poor, and thus not considered ‘newsmakers’ in the classic sense, and that they tend to live and die well off the radar screen of western attention, the global war also runs up against the outdated stereotype of Christianity as the oppressor rather than the oppressed.

Say ‘religious persecution’ to most makers of cultured secular opinion, and they will think of the Crusades, the Inquisition, Bruno and Galileo, the Wars of Religion and the Salem witch trials. Today, however, we do not live on the pages of a Dan Brown potboiler, in which Christians are dispatching mad assassins to settle historical scores. Instead, they’re the ones fleeing assassins others have dispatched.

Moreover, public discussion of religious freedom issues often suffers from two sets of blinders. First, it’s generally phrased in terms of western church/state tensions, such as the recent tug-of-war between religious leaders in the United States and the Obama White House over contraception mandates as part of health care reform, or tensions in the United Kingdom over the 2010 Equality Act and its implications for church-affiliated adoption agencies vis-à-vis same-sex couples. The truth is that in the West, a threat to religious freedom means someone might get sued; in many other parts of the world, it means someone might get shot, and surely the latter is the more dramatic scenario.

Secondly, discussion is sometimes limited by an overly narrow conception of what constitutes ‘religious violence’. If a female catechist is killed in the Democratic Republic of Congo, for instance, because she’s persuading young people to stay out of militias and criminal gangs, one might say that’s a tragedy but not martyrdom, because her assailants weren’t driven by hatred of the Christian faith. Yet the crucial point isn’t just what was in the mind of her killers, but what was in the heart of that catechist, who knowingly put her life on the line to serve the gospel. To make her attackers’ motives the only test, rather than her own, is to distort reality.

Whatever the motives for the silence, it’s well past time for it to end. Pope Francis recognised this in remarks during a General Audience last month.

‘When I hear that so many Christians in the world are suffering, am I indifferent, or is it as if a member of my own family is suffering?’ the Pope asked his following. ‘Am I open to that brother or that sister in my family who’s giving his or her life for Jesus Christ?’

In 2011, the Catholic Patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, who leads a church with more than its fair share of new martyrs, phrased the same questions more plaintively during a conference in London. He bluntly asked: ‘Does anybody hear our cry? How many atrocities must we endure before somebody, somewhere, comes to our aid?’

There may be no question about the destiny of Christianity in the early 21st century more deserving of a compelling answer.

John L. Allen Jr is author of The Global War on Christians: Dispatches from the Front Lines of Anti-Christian Persecution. This is an updated version of a Spectator cover story from October 2013.

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Show comments
  • semperfi1371

    Organized religion is dying, thank dog!

  • David

    When you really have a close look at Pakistan – and the abhorrent views of the majority (yes – majority) of Pakistanis – it is stunning that any Western country admits Pakistani immigrants.

    While yes, the liberal, far-left mind finds it unfair to tar any individual with the horrifically intolerant views of the majority his compatriots, in this case it’s warranted, simply on the grounds of security.

    From the revision of educational textbooks to edit out every religious minority except Sunni Islam (and indeed textbooks that appear to inspire hatred of others,) to the tacit wide acceptance of extremists in positions of power, to the constant stream of “on the streets” violence by average Pakistanis against non-Muslims, to the 10,000+ supporters who shut down Islamabad in support of an executed extremist murderer, to the laws of apostasy that target the innocent and often end in murder, to the gruesome conduct of the extremists themselves – the latest being suicide bombers who targeted dozens of children in a playground, previously the machine gunning of a school killing 130 – Pakistanis at all levels just emerge as a people that are simply too dangerous to take on as immigrants.

    If you have any doubts, just ask the families of the Rotherham underage “white girl” prostitution scandal – a grotesquely repugnant case where nearly all the perpetrators were Pakistani men.

  • Kaleem Dean

    Genocidal terrorism against Christians is indeed at its highest but not being recognized by the US and the UK. Finding out the reasons of terrorism in the Europe is important to fight against it. Apparently it is being believed that lack of opportunities and unemployment could be the cause of this growing terrorism in the Europe but several ISIS motivated people are working at the airports of Brussels. In country like Pakistan,30-40% unemployment rate was never considered the root cause but a mind set of religiously motivated group of people were behind all terrorism against ethnic minorities. They want pure Islamic states where everyone should be Muslim. Their dream is to see the whole planet as Islamic state.

  • Roger Hudson

    Where are the ” Je suis Lahore” demos and vigils?
    Britain and Europe ( if not the EU machine) is basically a place built on a Christian culture, we should be defending it. Unfortunately Brits know little about history, Charles Martell, Eugene of Savoy ( prinz Eugen) or Jan Sobieski, all fighters for Europe against Islamic invaders.

  • Maybe

    I don’t see that there is so much a war on Christians as there is a war by certain sects on all others that are not of their particular brand of Islam or whatever, Even in the Lahore attack the majority of victims were Muslims.

  • https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/home Dean Jackson

    “The Lahore attacks are just the latest atrocity in a war on Christians”

    In fact the attacks are classic false flag Marxist operations, a continuation of the Marxist ‘War on Religion’ that began with the West’s creation of what would soon become the USSR on November 7, 1917…

    https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/the-marxist-co-option-of-history-and-the-use-of-the-scissors-strategy-to-manipulate-history-towards-the-goal-of-marxist-liberation

    Muslims don’t wage war on Christians living in peace with Muslims, only Marxists pretending to be Muslim perform such immoral and forbidden activities.

    • JabbaPapa

      More cut’n’paste gibberish, then.

      • Sanctimony

        Gratuitous verbal abuse !

    • David

      Muslim terrorism is going to get a whole lot worse. So one of these days, Dean. It’s going to you or someone you care about on that train, or at that cafe, or at that concert. And the delusional garbage you wrote will seem like such a bitter irony.

      • https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/home Dean Jackson

        “Muslim terrorism is going to get a whole lot worse.”

        When did the West VERIFY the ‘collapse’ of the USSR? Ah, you never thought about that because the Marxist co-opted media didn’t direct your attention to the missing verification!

        The fraudulent ‘collapse’ of the USSR (and East Bloc) couldn’t have been pulled off until both political parties in the United States (and political parties elsewhere in the West) were co-opted by Marxists, which explains why verification of the ‘collapse’ was never undertaken by the West, such verification being (1) a natural administrative procedure (since the USSR wasn’t occupied by Western military forces); and (2) necessary for the survival of the West. Recall President Reagan’s favorite phrase, “Trust, but verify”.

        It gets worse–the ‘freed’ Soviets and West also never (1) de-Communized the Soviet Armed Forces of its Communist Party officer corps, which was 90% officered by Communist Party members; and (2) arrested/de-mobilized the 6-million vigilantes that assisted the Soviet Union’s Ministry of the Interior and police control the populations of the larger cities during the period of ‘Perestroika’ (1986-1991)!

        There can be no collapse of the USSR (or East Bloc nations) without…

        Verification, De-Communization and De-mobilization.

        The West never verified the collapse of the USSR because no collapse occurred, since if a real collapse had occurred the West would have verified it, since the survival of the West depends on verification. Conversely, this proves that the political parties of the West were co-opted by Marxists long before the fraudulent collapse of the USSR, since the survival of the West depends on verification.

        The following are two discoveries I made in April 2015 regarding the Yugoslav ‘civil wars’ and ‘collapse’ of the USSR, and what they prove about the institutions of the West…

        (I) Communist control of Yugoslavia ‘civil wars’ gone unnoticed for quarter century.

        Secessionist Yugoslav Orthodox, Catholic and Muslim factions waged dirty wars against each other, neglecting to first wipe out the 9% of the population that attempted to do away with religion in Yugoslavia, proving the wars were orchestrated and controlled by the communist faction. That 9% constitutes members of the League of Communists of Yugoslavia, the Marxist party that subjugated Yugoslavia from 1945 until the party’s dissolution in January 1990. Before any religious sectarian strife, first there would have been massive reprisals against the reviled Communists who implemented policies to wipe out religion in Yugoslavia. The fact that no such reprisals took place proves that the breakup of Yugoslavia, during the Yugoslav Wars (1991-2001), was manufactured and controlled by the Communists; and

        (II) When Soviet citizens were liberated from up to 74 years of horrific Marxist-atheist oppression on December 26, 1991, the day the USSR officially ended, there were ZERO celebrations throughout the USSR, proving (1) the ‘collapse’ of the USSR is a strategic ruse; and (2) the political parties of the West were already co-opted by Marxists, otherwise the USSR (and East Bloc nations) couldn’t have gotten away with the ruse.

        ZERO celebrations, as the The Atlantic article inadvertently informs us…

        http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2011/12/20-years-since-the-fall-of-the-soviet-union/100214/

        Notice, however, the Kremlin staged anti-government demonstrations that took place in Russia (and other Soviet republics) in the years immediately preceding the ‘collapse’, yet ZERO celebrations after the ‘collapse’!

        The so-called ‘War on Terror’ is an operation being carried out by the Marxist co-opted governments of the West in alliance with the USSR and other Communist nations, the purpose being to (1) destroy the prominence of the West in the eyes of the world, where the West is seen (i) invading nations without cause; (ii) causing chaos around the globe; and (iii) killing over one-million civilians and boasting of torture; (2) close off non-Russian supplies of oil for export, thereby increasing the price of oil, the higher price allowing oil exporting Russia to maintain economic stability while she modernizes and increases her military forces; (3) destroy the United States Armed Forces via the never-ending ‘War on Terror’; the ultimate purpose of the aforementioned to (4) bring about the demise of the United States in the world, opening up a political void to be filled by a new pan-national entity composed of Europe and Russia (replacing the European Union), a union ‘From the Atlantic to Vladivostok’;** which will (5) see the end of NATO.

        For more on this discovery read the article, ‘The Marxist Co-Option Of History And The Use Of The Scissors Strategy To Manipulate History Towards The Goal Of Marxist Liberation’ …

        https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/the-marxist-co-option-of-history-and-the-use-of-the-scissors-strategy-to-manipulate-history-towards-the-goal-of-marxist-liberation

        My blog…

        https://sites.google.com/site/deanjackson60/

  • Kasperlos

    And one thing for certain: there’s no sense in allowing these Christians to migrate to the UK. Not when they would face their fellow countrymen who hate them and who already reside by the millions in the UK. They’d simply pick up where they left off, only the scenes of the crimes would be Leeds, Glasgow, Birmingham, London, Luton, etc. The UK is a disaster zone as it now stands, no need to add to it.

  • http://www.gm-rms-cnestu310.com/ Enigmaticus-Paradoximus

    Well, “everyone knows” that only Christians can be racist, homophobic, misogynist bigots and that is what makes them fair game.

  • masmanz

    In Iraq Christian were living peacefully for centuries, one was a vice president under Saddam, till a Christian army under Bush attacked and destroyed the country. The Iraqi military was disbanded but was not replaced by appropriate number of US military personnel because we didn’t want to send enough soldiers. We are still seeing the repercussions of that ‘mother of all wars’.

  • mollysdad

    “In 2011, the Catholic Patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, who leads a church with more than its fair share of new martyrs, phrased the same questions more plaintively during a conference in London. He bluntly asked: ‘Does anybody hear our cry? How many atrocities must we endure before somebody, somewhere, comes to our aid?’”

    If the Patriarch were to refrain from whingeing for the Muslims when the Israelis kill them, I might be able to take him seriously. He ought to embrace Zionism, tell his fellow-Palestinians that God have the Land of Israel to the Jews and the Muslims are welcome to convert to Christianity or leave.

    Islam is a threat to the peace of the world, and the sooner the world is rid of it, the better.

  • David Allen

    religion is itself the tragedy that all people must endure and until humans evolve beyond their sky god trope this will continue indefinitely with a constantly changing cast of suffering.

    • JabbaPapa

      Do you even know what “trope” means in the first place, or is it just something you started using to try and sound clever ?

      • Sanctimony

        You really are a presumptuous, contemptible old boot, aren’t you….

  • Odo Saunders

    In this context, we also need to refer to the report in today’s paper of the crucifixtion of the Indian Catholic priest, Father Tom Uzhunnallil, by followers of ISIL on Good Friday in Yemen. He had been kidnapped by Isil when the latter raided a missionary home in Aden on March 4. During the raid 16 people were murdered, including 5 Christian Ethiopian men and four nuns. The latter were shor in the head before having their heads smashed in. Apart from an editorial in the Daily Telegraph, there does not appear to have been much media comment on the matter, while our politicians are no doubt still enjoying their “well-earned Easter break.” For far too long the Church of England has indulged itself in the world of politics, while ignoring the real needs of Christians, both in this country and abroad. Now is the time for the hierachy of the Church of England to forget its narrow political aspirations and, together with political leaders, to galvanise opinion in support of beleagured Christian minorities around the world.
    Tonight, before you go to bed, please make a silent prayer and remember Father Tom and his fellow Christians who were so brutally murdered in Yeman.

  • Dominic Stockford

    Thank you Mr Allen.

    One small thing, I would have preferred the words of Peter, in the Bible (to those of a divisive figure like the Pope):
    “Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. Resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the same kinds of suffering are being experienced by your brotherhood throughout the world.”

  • Nil_Einne

    >Yet the crucial point isn’t just what was in the mind of her killers, but what was in the heart of that catechist, who knowingly put her life on the line to serve the gospel. To make her attackers’ motives the only test, rather than her own, is to distort reality.

    No it’s not distorting reality, what you’re proposing is. What motivates the killers is of course the heart of whether something is an attack on someone because of their religion, or an attack for some other reason. Otherwise lots of things becomes attacks on religions including a lot of stuff I’m sure you wouldn’t call an attack on someone because of their religion particularly when it isn’t Christianity that’s being referred to. (I wonder whether you’d even say the same if we replace Christianity with animist beliefs etc in your example.) In fact there’s no reason why religion should be singled out but also gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity etc. All of these affect why people do what they do, but if it wasn’t part of the attackers motivation, it wasn’t an attack due to the that part of the attackers identity.

    Christians are of course free to call someone a martyr if they want, just as other religions are free to call someone a martyr. It doesn’t mean we should say the attack was because of their religion when it was because of something they were doing that the attackers didn’t like (no matter how noble what they were doing, or how disgusting the attack) and the attacker didn’t care (probably didn’t even know) about their religion.

    As for your statistics, most evidence strongly suggests in numeral terms, Muslims are the most affected by religious motivated violence at the present time. Heck many of the examples you cite like Iraq and Pakistan, it’s clear that other Muslims are affected much more than Christians. It’s true that a big percentage of this comes from other Muslims but that doesn’t make it okay or mean that Christians are the only victims worthy of attention. The small number of Christians in these countries means in some ways it can have a more severe effect on the survival of the faith in that particular country, but again, that doesn’t mean it’s the most serious problem. (Not saying that attacks on Muslims is the most serious problem either. Rather that these sort of attempts to make certain groups the ones who we should concentrate on is harmful.) Note of course that there are a number of small groups (including small Muslim groups) which tend to be more severely affected than Christians taken as a whole because they are an even smaller group. (We could also divide Christians into different groups even if it doesn’t fit your narrative.)

    Another key point is related to what I said earlier. There’s no reason why religious motivated violence should be the only thing which we consider. LGBTs are for example often affected by violence because of their sexual orientation or gender identity. And often this comes at least partly from religion, both Christianity and Islam. (There is the infamous case of Uganda, where the situation seems to have been at least partially come about due to the influence of American preachers. Ironically the same preachers who tend to talk the most about how Christianity is being persecuted although I’m in no way suggesting you are similar.)

    Ultimately it’s clear there are a lot of problems in the world and people all over are harmed, killed or persecuted for a large variety of reasons. We should be working to end these problems no matter who they effect and not trying to do a “my X is worse affected than your X”.

  • Nil_Einne

    >Yet the crucial point isn’t just what was in the mind of her killers,
    but what was in the heart of that catechist, who knowingly put her life
    on the line to serve the gospel. To make her attackers’ motives the only
    test, rather than her own, is to distort reality.

    No it’s
    not distorting reality, what you’re proposing is. What motivates the
    killers is of course the heart of whether something is an attack on
    someone because of their religion, or an attack for some other reason.
    Otherwise lots of things becomes attacks on religions including a lot of
    stuff I’m sure you wouldn’t call an attack on someone because of their
    religion particularly when it isn’t Christianity that’s being referred
    to. (I wonder whether you’d even say the same if we replace Christianity
    with animist beliefs etc in your example.) In fact there’s no reason
    why religion should be singled out but also gender, sexual orientation,
    ethnicity etc. All of these affect why people do what they do, but if it
    wasn’t part of the attackers motivation, it wasn’t an attack due to the
    that part of the attackers identity.

    Christians
    are of course free to call someone a martyr if they want, just as other
    religions are free to call someone a martyr. It doesn’t mean we should
    say the attack was because of their religion when it was because of
    something they were doing that the attackers didn’t like (no matter how
    noble what they were doing, or how disgusting the attack) and the
    attacker didn’t care (probably didn’t even know) about their religion.

  • Alexeon

    I don’t buy that Christians are being persecuted, but if they were, I’d say its just desserts considering all the persecution that religion has done throughout its history. Maybe it will convince those crazies to get a brain and stop believing fairy tails from the bronze age.

    • Fulgentian

      What a load of nonsense.
      1) What “persecution” are you talking about?
      2) Why is one crazy to believe in God?
      3) Can’t you atheists come up with any better argument than pathetic ‘fairy tails [sic]’ name-calling?

      • Ian G

        The responses are:
        – the Crusades and er, er…..
        – because that’s what Richard Dawkins told me to think
        – have we ever?

      • Alexeon

        1. The entire middle ages
        2. Imaginary friends
        3. I don’t need a better argument. Sorry if I misspelled, it was late.

        • Mr B J Mann

          And what about the persecution of the early Christians by the Romans?

          And what about the conquest r-pe, pillage, enslavement, and other oppression and persecution of Christians across North Africa the Middle East and not just the Holy Land, India, what is now Pakistan, half way into Afghanistan (all the way I you want to count the Buddhist half), the Balkans, parts of Italy, including Sicily, France, most of Spain, and even raids on Britain and Ireland, by Islam

          • Alexeon

            I didn’t say the other religions were any better.

    • JabbaPapa

      I don’t buy that Christians are being persecuted, but if they were, I’d say its just desserts

      How despicably hateful !!

      • Fulgentian

        Exactly. Go and explain to the husband who lost wife and children in Lahore that he deserves it because of the Crusades.
        It’s precisely this kind of moral degeneracy that makes the West ripe for desctruction.

    • David

      Hey England. This toxic guy and others like him – let’s call them the extreme far-left, self-loathing, white guilters – are the reason your cities are teeming with people who despise you, your country, your culture… and your children.

      There’s so much talk of parallel communities, lack of assimilation, the growth of extremism in immigrant communities… yet no discussion whatsoever on how on earth so many millions got in in the first place.

      The answer – is guys like this guy. The extreme far left and its power elite. Those who view non-white, non-Christian immigration as a just revenge on “white, colonising, racist” Western nations.

      In effect, guys like him directly blame you for sins committed a hundred, two hundred, a thousand years ago.

  • Richard e. Sherwin

    you really dont need any more comments, but since the major xn orgs are busy bds’ing israel (the only place christians DONT have to flee from in the mid east or africa… and since nothing here is new to readers of israeli papers…what the he(aven)ll, why not. youre talking about a monstrous failure of christians to give a damn about christians being slaughtered by muslims (some fundamentalist some not), while cheering on a fake multiculturalism that protects muslims from the crimes committed in their name, with their moderate indifference, and their clean hands. good luck. it’s too late for a crusade to stop the crescade erasing xy from the ME it grew up in. but nostalgia and handwriting and sighs are very genteel, and at least arent as hypocritical as organized xn silence, or the media’s indifference. try some pro palestinian kairos and see if it brings anyone back alive, or gives priority in a christian culture to christian immigrants fleeing islamic love.

  • ncberns

    So many words, so little reality, so much paranoia. I know all this feels personal to you and your particular religion, but there’s a global war on everything that’s NOT ME, whether that’s religion or skin color or a thousand other things someone somewhere finds unacceptable. This world has many, many, far too many real problems; Christian persecution isn’t very high on the list.

    • Fulgentian

      That’s highly offensive. Killing women and children in Pakistan is not a ‘real problem’?
      Nasty.

      • ncberns

        That’s not at all what I meant. I ache for every single death on every side. I mourn the loss of sanity in this world. The deaths are real and I’m well aware of Christian persecution from many sides. I know what ISIS has done to them and so many others. And I think it’s all bad. But if we were listing all the terrible things being done to Jews and Christians, Muslims and Buddhists, teachers and writers (and on and on) we’d be hard pressed to pick the worse. They’re all bad, all real, all terrible problems. I have no desire to say which is worse. Or which is the very worst.

    • Mr B J Mann

      So many words it was clearly too many for you to read or you wouldn’t have wasted so many words shooting yourself in the foot and proving how dumb you were!

      So which of YOUR many paranoid “real” ME ME ME “problems” do you consider pushes the rape, torture, crucifiction and killing of Christians down the list?!

      Can I suggest you read articles before “responding” in future?!

  • Nunya Dudenstein

    Christians receive religious persecution at the hands of other religious people. But there are Christian terrorists as well. Abortion clinic bombers, Sikh temple attacks, etc. are motivated by their faith to hurt others. The answer isn’t to bring attention to persecution of Christians but to bring attention to the persecution of human beings by religious zealots.

    • Mr B J Mann

      How many Christians in the US and how many “Christian terrorist abortion clinic bombers”? And how many have they killed?!

      How many Muslims in the US?

      An how many Muslim 9/11 bombers just a a example?!

      And how many have THEY killed?!?!?!!!

      And how many Christian terrorist abortion clinic bombers or Sikh temple attackers in Madrid? Or London?! Or Paris?!?! Or Brussels?!?!?! Or even Lahore?!?!?!?!!!!

      And, if any, how many have they killed, if any, between them?!?!?!!!

      • Nunya Dudenstein

        Two wrongs don’t make a right. Both are just wrong. You can’t justify one by pointing out the wrongs of the other.

        • Mr B J Mann

          Did I said they did?!

  • Ominous

    The UK has mass-imported Pakistani Islamic supremacism and the backward, corrupt tribal politics that makes Pakistan a failing state. Is any one bothered? Nope.

  • spacecynic

    Last I checked, the biggest crusade is the one perpetrated by predominately “Christian” natives on their former (predominately Muslim) colonies in the Middle East and Africa. Which have resulted in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of civilians and the creation of chaos and the refugee crisis. But go on fueling the persecuted Christian myth if it helps you sleep better at night.

    • JabbaPapa

      A ludicrous parody of reality.

    • Mr B J Mann

      I think you’ll find the “crusade’ you allude to is a “progressive” lefty “liberal one to bring “democracy” and “equality” to them!

  • Joshua Mar

    Some are real christians some are targeted because of the name. But the world doesn’t know God and they think they the rulers…what God? But the world is evil. Men have always killed each other for various reasons throughout the whole time we walked on the earth. Double minded, thinking evil of one another, having unequal measures, aggrandizing themselves….so they attack jews, blacks, muslims attack muslims, white people think evil of a poor white man….it doesn’t matter men know evil and do evil. They refuse to listen…

  • JabbaPapa

    Disqus still completely bugs out at 600+ comments, especially when some of them get deleted.

    Do the Admins in here organise no systematic bug reporting ?

  • semperfi1371

    All organized religion is dying. Let them all take each other out…the sooner, the better.

  • Jeff Evans

    Perhaps it’s not news because persecution of Christians in Pakistan has been going on for decades. Maybe not bombs, but churches burnt down and individuals murdered, especially in smaller towns and villages. Evangelical Christian organisations with links to Pakistan know about it, and report on it within churches. Not a lot one can do about it (apart from praying) as police and authorities are unlikely to pursue cases.

  • Odo Saunders

    The problem here is that many Western countries are now largely secular in outlook, with the result that politicians are largely unconcerned with the adherents of a faith with which they no longer share its values and outlook. I have been writing to my local M.P and M.E.P. over the past few years in order to try and persuade them to take up the issue of the persecution of Christians in Pakistan and various other countries in the Middle East. My M.E.P. did write to the relevant Commissioner about this problem, and the latter did write back to the effect that the E.U. was monitoring the situation in Palistan! Fine words, which have not been followed up by any concrete decisions regarding foreign aid to those countries. The E.U. is prepared to impose sanctions against Russia, but at least there is more awareness of this problem in that country than there is in the West. My local M.P. has neither been prepared so far to put down a question to this effect in Parliament nor to write to the relevant minister. When I do write to the relevant minister, all that happens is that I get a reply from an official which ammounts to no more than three to four pages of waffle. When I recently wrote to my local M.P. about the fate of Christians in Syria, he wrote back to the effect that everything will be fine once President Assad is removed from office and democracy is implemented in that benighted country!! Can you credit such an answer from one of our so-called elected representatives. I have written back to him asking whether President Putin might make such a solution unlikely in the forseeable future! I have yet to receive a reply, and his secretary has now been instructed to inform me that they have not been receiving my communications! What do you expect from an M.P. who initially backed the idea of Brexit, but now supports this country remaining in the E.U.! Any M.P. who is mainly concerned with his future ministerial career is not going to campaign very hard to relieve the suffering of Chrisrtians in other parts of the world. I fear that is the attitude of many M.P.’s today. Ultimately, I feel so helpless as regards what I can do in the futre to help my beleagured fellow Christians.

  • zanzamander

    “Most people would say that journalists had failed to provide the proper context to understand the news.”

    Don’t worry, most people already realise that most “journalists” are not reporters of facts but propagandists of one faction of the political, religious or business cabal or another.

    Channels like BBC, Al Jazeera, CNN, Fox or media houses like Guardian, NYT etc. are just political, religious or commercial extensions of their pay masters – mostly lefties, Islamo-friendly and anti-Israeli.

    We have learned not to believe everything we read or hear in the news.

    As far as the attacks on Christians is concerned, you have to realsie that Christians are not the only religious group being attacked by Islamists. People of all religions around the globe are being massacred, converted or simply being hounded out of their ancestral lands by the Islamists.

    Secondly, there is an army of Christians scouring India, Afghanistan, Myanmar, China, the far East etc. prothletising Hindus, Buddhists and peoples of other faiths in their millions. These Christian army is engaged in all sorts of devious, manipulative and corrupt ways in turning people away from the faiths of their ancestors and turning them against each other. They control the media, NGOs, student unions and many other influential institutions that has brought them in direct conflict with the local governments and religious leaders there.

    So far from being in danger, Christians are actually riding a wave crest on the back of religious vigor inspired by Islamists in the far East.

    As a “journalist” yourself, go look into this.

  • greencoat

    As long as we avoid that dreaded ‘Far-Right Backlash’.

  • Gilbert White

    The Graphic for this article seems on par with the infamous Motoons. Anybody converting the illustrative ambience into a narrative would be put into pending in the outer strata of Dante along with Mahound!

  • Cyril Sneer

    What? Surely not Islam again… there isn’t a day that goes by without news of an Islamic atrocity.

    Thankfully we have the bleeding hearts brigade who are more concerned about the non-entity of anti-muslim reprisal attacks than the fact that 30 odd people in Belgium were brutally murdered just a few days ago.. and well how many more across the globe have been killed by this Islamic cancer since then.

  • Albert Zbingswiki

    Look, the most important thing, nay, the over-riding objective in every single aspect of modern life, is that we must not offend muslims or hint in any way that they are somehow not peaceful.
    As long as we do that, everything will be fine. Appeasement totally works. History shows this.

    Sarcasm. But, sadly, it’s apparently how Western leaders actually seem to think.

    • outlawState

      Western leaders are far closer to Islam than Christianity. The commonality is “Deism.” They are both philosophically, deists, i.e. worshippers of God after man-invented rules. Whereas Christians have to follow God’s rules. So you are quite correct. Islam and Western leaders are in bed together.

  • JabbaPapa

    Funny isn’t it, how this article deploring anti-Christian hatred and violence has acted as a magnet to hateful anti-Christians.

    The comboxes have been filled with atheist hatred and anti-Christian bigotry.

    • MC

      Speaking as an atheist lesbian transgender hetero male. I strongly disagree with everything you have to say. I respect the rights of Christians to be subservient and the rights of muslims to call the tunes so long as the Jews continue to work behind the scenes and control everything. They are all the people of the same book(s) and share a common god, and only those who stray from the path need to be terminated. Christianity has always been a peaceful religion and only those falling outside – witches, gays, protestants (or Catholics if you’re protestant), heretics and such like – who are damned to damnation anyway will perish by the Christian sword. When Jews or Christians come into conflict with muslims it is the will of their god for this to happen, so don’t blame any individual person, as they are innocents in god’s greater plan, blame only the imaginary being in their heads.

  • kyalami

    A BBC analysis showed these stats are skewed, largely by including numbers from genocides in East Africa. The real number killed annually is not 100,000 but somewhere under 10,000, though that is still horrifying.

    • FrankieThompson

      A BBC analysis? That’ll be right then.

      • OmnipotentWizard

        Much better than the Daily Express, Pegida and THOSE websites.

  • StrategyKing

    Somehow the writer cannot put 2 and 2 together. The media does not talk about this because it does not fit the narrative. Notice the writer pointing out that Iraq had a thriving christian population prior to 91. Now it does not. What do you think might have contributed? Why not take a guess?

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