Coffee House

Could Britain’s evangelical Christians ever support a Trump-like figure?

14 March 2016

5:51 PM

14 March 2016

5:51 PM

Building walls, banning Muslims, mass deportations. However bad things appear in UK politics, we console ourselves with the thought that Trump could never happen here. Before that comforting thought tips over into full schadenfreude at the expense of our American cousins, we might wonder why that’s the case.

There are two obvious reasons we don’t have a Trump figure. Firstly, Trump’s appeal is in a class of its own. There’s nobody in British politics who matches his ‘outsider’ status, brazen style and celebrity. Secondly, our electoral system prevents significant gains by any outsider candidates. Ukip’s paltry one MP from over four million votes at the 2015 election confirms this.

Leaving aside the differences in personality and the electoral system, there’s another vast difference between the two countries which means that it’s highly unlikely we will ever see the emergence of a British Trump: the evangelical vote.

As any House of Cards or West Wing devotee knows, evangelical voters are key to the Republican base. Indeed the New York Times reported that Trump is outperforming Cruz by 33 per cent to 22 among the evangelical bloc. Incorrectly used as a cipher for ‘horrible Christian bigots’ by some in the secular media, there is nonetheless a vast voting bloc in America which is socially conservative and firmly attached to the Republican party.

Just how Christian these voters actually are is up for debate, but it’s clear that among those who claim the label ‘evangelical’, Donald Trump is very popular. His biggest Super Tuesday wins came across the South where evangelical voters are concentrated. He has now begun polling above Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio — both conservative Christians — among evangelical voters.

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This is astonishing, considering Trump’s business interests in gambling, his record of two failed marriages, his inability to name a Bible verse and his admittance that he has never asked forgiveness from God – a key tenet of evangelical faith.

Yet Trump is speaking to this demographic and the endorsements are rolling in. Jerry Falwell Jnr – son of Jerry Falwell of the Moral Majority – and a key cornerstone of the Religious Right, has been among Trump’s key backers. Trump has been seen praying with ‘big name’ televangelists such as Paula White and Kenneth Copeland, and he recently appeared with veteran Religious Right leader and conspiracy theorist Pat Robertson.

Theories abound as to exactly why Trump is proving viable with a growing number of evangelicals. One reason might be that they’ve been fooled into thinking they need ‘one of their own’ in the White House in the past and it hasn’t worked. George W Bush was a card-carrying evangelical, yet even with a Republican Congress, he wasn’t able to legislate fully in their interests – there was little change in the law on abortion, for instance. So now, the argument goes, they’re voting for a commander-in-chief, not a ‘pastor-in-chief’.

For any Republican to win the nomination (and then the Presidential election) they have to reach out beyond this evangelical base. Libertarians, free marketeers, neo-conservatives and, of course, swing voters need to be convinced. Yet it is impossible to underestimate the significance of the evangelical bloc. In America, over a quarter of the whole population self-identifies as evangelical. Simply put, to win as a Republican, you must energise the evangelical base – something Trump’s team is beginning to achieve against the odds – and something John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012 failed to do.

What of the British evangelical vote? Though we lack some of the other specifically American voting blocs – Hispanics and ‘soccer moms’ for instance – in the UK we have our very own evangelical Christian contingent. Would that group ever fall in line with a populist British version of Trump? It seems unlikely, for a number of reasons.

In the aftermath of the last US election I researched this British evangelical constituency for the thinktank Theos. At the time I said, ‘There is no sign of the kind of tight-knit, symbiotic relationship between a right- of-centre political party and a unified Christian constituency emerging in the Britain as it did in the last quarter of a century in the US.’

I also found that British evangelicals are not nearly as convinced of the need for a smaller state and free-market policies as their American counterparts. British evangelicals are just not as easy to categorise as simply ‘right-wing.’ Evangelical Christians in Britain are more socially conservative than the general public, but their economic bias is left-of-centre, arguably more so than those of no religious faith.

We found a number of reasons why British evangelicals (and the wider Christian community) remain relatively socially conservative but are not as politicised as American evangelicals  Firstly, the establishment of the Church of England – and its more gentle and constructive approach to political engagement. Secondly the media landscape here – with only a fraction of the Christian media outlets accessible in the US. Thirdly, the left-leaning commitments of the majority of British Roman Catholics. Fourthly, the apolitical nature of senior British evangelical leaders, such as John Stott and Tom Wright. The final reason we don’t have a potential Trump-style support base among British evangelicals is the size of the constituency – the number of evangelicals is about two million, only around seven per cent of the total UK population, and they are spread fairly evenly nationally.

At the moment, despite signs of growth in the evangelical wings of the British church, there is no sign that the political commitments of evangelicals here are shifting significantly. This being the case, even if a Trump-style demagogue was to arise in the UK he would be excluded from the mainstream not just by the electoral system, but by a lack of evangelical support.

Andy Walton is a writer and broadcaster specialising in religion and politics. He works for the Centre for Theology & Community and is an associate researcher at Theos. He tweets here.

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Show comments
  • Gilbert White

    Make no mistake if Farage looked like a thirties demi god he would have swept the board!

  • pobjoy

    Some, who are called ‘evangelicals’ by others, believe that they are accounted righteous, fully righteous, in the sight of God, by faith in the completed work of Jesus on the cross, who, for that reason, is called ‘Christ’. The word ‘christ’ denotes saviour, and therefore lord, out of gratitude for salvation. Because, in this view, that work of justification by Jesus was completed, one cannot add to it by one’s own good works; to suppose that one can is to deny that Jesus was or is the Christ. Evanglicalism arose in modern times, after the doctrines of Luther and Calvin had been found wanting. For centuries before them, there were many who taught that good works can be added to faith as means of justification; but some such teachers today have adopted the epithet ‘evangelical’, especially in the USA, and with the assistance of the media, it must be said.

    The USA was founded largely by Calvinists, whose emphasis was akin to Puiritans, whose concern was with outward and ostentatious show of virtue, rather than inward gratitude for salvation. That strand of thought remains in moralising American attitudes to sexual matters, abortion, and the like. In addition, there are many in the USA who call themselves evangelicals whose obsession is with belief in literal interpretation of early Genesis, and recent creation of the universe. This ‘requirement’ is also a form of claiming to be accounted righteous by one’s own works. Another type of claimant to evangelicalism in the USA is the charismatist, whose implication, if not insistence, is that one cannot be a Christian unless one performs the ‘works’ of raising one’s arms, uttering sounds various, but either meaningless, or trite, in public meetings.

    So the USA has three types of ‘evangelical’ that are not recognised as valid by those who believe that righteousness in the sight of God is by faith in the completed work of Jesus on the cross, i.e. by Christians.

  • https://medium.com/@bernybelvedere Belvy

    My column from today explores Trump from a similar angle: http://thefederalist.com/2016/03/15/how-trumpism-emulates-megachurches/

  • Mr Creosote

    Did everyone see Donald duck – when that guy tried to storm the stage?
    Quackers the lot of ’em…

  • MikeF

    Completely false analogy – the nearest equivalent in the UK to the mentality of the US Evangelical ‘right’ is the Labour ‘left’.

  • venyanamore

    George W Bush was not an evangelical. That minor point apart, a very interesting article.

  • Ray Spring

    I suspect most Evangelical Christians do not even vote.
    I am an Evangelical and I vote. I am a member of the English BNP and, here in NZ, of the equivalent political party.
    My cousin, a good job as an accountant in London, left after her friend was blown up in the tube attacks in London. She is now working in NZ, pulling pints. And safe for the moment.
    We need to keep maniacs out.
    I left Brum 40 years ago. It has now ethnically cleansed itself from the English, and is truly ‘multicultural’. What a mess.
    If English people could leave England and come to NZ we would be swamped with the millions fleeing.

    • red2black

      We need some advice from the indigenous Maoris on how to deal with a massive influx of alien immigrants.

      • flaxdoctor

        Maoris indigenous? Who knew? They think they arrived by boat.

        • red2black

          My mistake. I thought they’d been parachuted in.

          • flaxdoctor

            No, that was the *indigenous* Moa Hunters.

            • red2black

              I’ve seen one of their top-notch adze on TV. (tee hee)

    • willoweepforme

      So true Ray, so true.

  • JonBW

    Evangelical Christianity is rooted in non-conformism which was one of the most important foundations of the Labour Movement in this country.

    It has always been socially conservative and left-leaning in economic terms; and this is what the Old Labour Party reflected.

  • Mow_the_Grass

    Large uneducated segments of America – think that this is just a gigantic reality show with Trump playing a leading role.
    They don’t really comprehend the impact/effect it will have globally of electing a consumate showman and carnival barker to the highest position in the land.
    Obama has been an absolute disaster – but no point in electing another one (albeit from the opposing side)

    • rationality

      a) would you show that type bigotry to people of other religions, why is education different?
      b) isnt it a bit presumptuous and stereotypical that you think these people are less intelligent? They are blatantly more intelligent as they are less swayed by the mass media and obviously getting their sources elsewhere.

      Or are you showing your racism towards white people?

      • Mow_the_Grass

        Where in my post do i make mention of:
        a) religion and
        b) race?
        btw – your village has just called – they want their idiot back
        Now buzz

        • rationality

          ‘Large uneducated segments of America’

          Bigotry against my ethnic kin. The assertion that they are stupid. Do you know them? Have you met them? These people want change.

          Even if they were stupid why is that grounds to insult them? I may not like lefties much but thats because they think they are morally superior and do not apply logic to their insane beliefs.

          • Mow_the_Grass

            Moron

            • rationality

              And you have the audacity to say that the Americans are uneducated and thats the best you can do?

    • cmflynn

      Interesting how ‘uneducated’ is used now in the way ‘ill bred’ was used by previous generations and by the same kind of people. Education has taken the place of good breeding by those with little else to recommend them.

      • Mow_the_Grass

        You can be both ie educated and well bred – but well bred will never trump well educated – not in the modern context.
        In this regard i will point you to that landmark work ie The Bell Curve (Herrnstein/Murray) – in which they point out (amongst many other findings) that the standard of intelligence at Ivy league universities ie Yale/Harvard et al was extremely below par in the years leading up to WW2 ie the years when the institutions were the domain of the ‘well bred’ sons/daughters of the rich in the US.
        It was only after the introduction of the GI Bill – which allowed the sons/daughters of the not ‘well bred’ immigrant families ie Jews/Italians etc – that the intelligence level soared and was in part the impetus that pushed America onto the world stage in terms of the various sciences etc.
        Make of this what you will

  • Dominic Stockford

    The article fails because it doesn’t define ‘evangelical’.

    Some call those of a charismatic ‘happy clappy’ persuasion evangelical.
    Some call CofE ‘not quite liberal but like lively new songs’ evangelical.
    Some call majority black churches (especially in London) evangelical.
    I call Reformed Protestants evangelical.

    But all these groups cannot be evangelical as they all believe significantly different things, especially about the Bible and the nature of salvation. None of these groups, on its own, is enough to make a blind bit of difference to voting anyway.

    • E.I.Cronin

      I can’t help wondering if Trump’s success was the call for a moratorium on Islamic immigration? Do you think the various evangelical wings are the only Christian denominations who clearly see Islam for the existential threat it is and are willing to respond with a new Crusade? Whatever his personal failings in the eyes of the Church, he is the only candidate who has addressed the threat.

      • Dominic Stockford

        I agree with you. Islam is the biggest external threat to ‘Christendom’ that there is – regardless of false teaching within Christianity it must be dealt with.

        • E.I.Cronin

          It does seem like the evangelicals (as you point out that’s a very wide umbrella) are the only ones to publicly observe reality. The mainstream Churches over here are at the forefront of fast-tracking the submission process. I’ve often quoted Robert Spencer on this issue – we can all resume squabbling once the major threat is dealt with. For now we all have to work together.

      • cmflynn

        ‘…….Do you think the various evangelical wings are the only Christian denominations who clearly see Islam for the existential threat it is …….’
        Well, Traditional Catholics do but their numbers are still small compared to the majority who went quite daft after Vatican II and felt all denominations would live together in the future in a happy multicultural…………You know the rest.

        • E.I.Cronin

          What a shame. And I’m guessing nations with a strong traditional Catholic base like most of Central & South America haven’t been exposed to mass migration as yet. Perhaps the only denominations left alive to the threat would be the Orthodox Churches. Well, be interesting to see how the next primaries go for Trump and if he keeps the evangelical vote.

    • MikePage

      +10 The word has like many others suffered definition creep in the Internet Age and arguing for the pre-Internet definition won’t achieve anything. When an article like this comes along it’s time to throw away the dictionary and read between the lines.

      I suspect that in mentioning Copeland he is thinking of the charismatic, prosperity gospel “wing”. Amazing that anyone considers that mainstream evangelicalism but there you go.

      • Dominic Stockford

        He ‘probably’ does consider that ‘feelings based’ activity to be ‘the’ definition of evangelical, but he simply doesn’t say.

        I know that we stopped using ‘evangelical’ on our church notice board because unchurched people (most people by far therefore) thought that this meant we were raving charismatics with such weird ideas. In West Middlesex that grouping is in fact possibly smaller than the number of conservative Bible-centred Christians, they simply drive miles and miles to one point (inaccessible to those without transport) and meet together in one lump. Thus making more noise, and being more noticeable in worship but less effective in ministering to the various local communities they actually live in.

        • MikePage

          Where I am in East Kent I would estimate every town has at least one “out there” church; they vary in size. It is getting to the point where it’s considered the norm and to be a churchgoer attracts prejudice of an unexpected kind. Those places have a lot of turnover. There are a lot of disenchanted people out there with closed ears thanks to places like Life Church.

          • Dominic Stockford

            Yes, sad.

  • mattghg

    I’m a British Evangelical Christian and I have to say that I think this article is fair overall. I’m pro-free-market and pro-small-state and I get the impression that this is a minority position among my co-religionists.

    For analyses of the American Presidential race that I largely agree with, written by an Idaho church pastor, I recommend Douglas Wilson’s blog: https://dougwils.com/ . He endorses Cruz.

  • Sue Smith

    You need to watch this before considering any voting options! It is brilliant:

    https://www.prageru.com/courses/political-science/who-not-vote

    • red2black

      He persuaded me not to vote for anyone.

  • Disqus Bolloqus

    Do American evangelical Christians support Trump?

    • Tickertapeguy

      The evangelical votes for Trump are growing, not diminishing.

    • MikePage

      😉

  • http://www.ukipforbritain.co.uk/ ukipforbritainwebsite

    Alright, you’ve convinced me – Trump for President!

  • Tickertapeguy

    Outside of Trump the other candidates belong to the establishment.
    the establishment has been extremely anti Christian.

    • Disqus Bolloqus

      So a billionaire property tycoon and celebrity isn’t part of the establishment. Beam me up Scottie!

      • Tickertapeguy

        Answer a question with a question
        show me how Trump is part of the US establishment?
        show me how Trump is similar to being part of the Establishment like Cruz whose wife was 2nd in command at Goldman Sachs earning 500 thousand dollars per year and Goldman Sachs is one of the major banks of the Federal Reserve?
        the ball is in your court.

        • Disqus Bolloqus

          He’s a billionaire property tycoon who inherited a fortune from his dad, and made another by trading and dealing with the global elite and Wall Street establishment. He’s one of them. Meet the new boss same as the old boss. The fact his rivals are also members of the Establishment, doesn’t mean Trump isn’t.

          • Tickertapeguy

            My your stupidity shines forth:
            Trump got 1 million from his father and made it into 10 to 15 billion. He paid that million back
            Trump’s brother also got a million from his father and did nothing with it.
            Trump
            deals with heads of state to heads of commerce that is why he qualifies.
            BTW you hypocrite you deftly avoided Ted Cruz’s connection to the Federal Reserve.

            • Dicky14

              He inherited significantly more than $1 million.

              • Tickertapeguy

                why do you care so much what Trump exactly got?
                why do you not care that he paid it back?
                why this scrutiny on Donald Trump?
                but
                -none on the wealth, dynastic aspect and the power of the Clinton duo?
                -how about an equal level of scrutiny on Obobo the black President ? none?
                -how about the other candidates including Ted Cruz whose wife was 2nd in command in Goldman Sachs which is one of the banks of the Federal Reserve and Ted got loans from that bank, and we do not know what collateral he put up for those loans?
                -How about this kind of scrutiny towards the Liberal government in D.C? none?
                -How about other Presidents before Obobo? none?
                -Only Trump gets this level of scrutiny? my aren’t you “really concerned’ you double talking hypocrite.

                • Dicky14

                  I couldn’t really give a monkeys but let’s not make out that he’s some rags to riches entrepreneur or self-made business guru. Whichever way you look at it, he’s a member of the elite. I kind of like the guy but to suggest the other candidates aren’t under scrutiny isn’t really valid. You may want to relax a bit, this is the Spectator, not Drudge – we don’t get a vote!

                • Tickertapeguy

                  Well I voted for Trump in the primaries
                  and
                  I will vote for him if he is elected the nominee, in the general elections
                  you can vote for whoever you want.

                • Dicky14

                  Well no, I can’t as i’m English, but good luck. Having such long campaigns would irritate me senseless.

                • Tickertapeguy

                  you are telling me. God. layer upon layer of very complicated electoral process
                  Caucuses. that is a joke
                  Primaries. At least 3 kinds and in some states like Texas it can change within that state
                  Electoral college and their power
                  Finally the general elections.
                  All through the whole process is the campaigning and the silly debates.
                  each step plenty of room for corruption

                • Dicky14

                  I’ve been fighting for this British referendum since 2008 – we got it against all the odds and now all the corporations and special interests are making stuff up to fight us with. Good luck fella – I hope you have a fun night tonight.

                • Tickertapeguy

                  From my angle I see a lot of positive aspects for Brexit. All that was good when the EU formed is now spent.
                  Now what is coming out of the EU is done by her leaders who show little attention to the people.
                  In my opinion the EU has served her purpose and now needs to dramatically change or die.
                  One compelling issue is the migrants. Leaders will not budge on that.
                  The “greatness” of Great Britain was achieved, by and large, when Great Britain was an independent nation and not member of a union of European states. I guess that will come back when and if your nation gains her independence
                  Some aspects such as
                  the church of England (a cultural issue and the personality of the British)
                  The value of the pound
                  the sacrosanct aspect of the UK’s borders.
                  are some of them.
                  As for today’s primaries it is beginning to look like a very dirty fight between the establishment and Trump.
                  If Trump ever becomes President he plans to remove a good deal of what Obama put in place. Audit the Federal Reserve, IRS, and downsize the massive Federal government. A lot of people in high places have a lot to lose if Trump wins and everything to gain if he loses.

                • Leon Wolfeson

                  Ah, whining because you got your way…

                  …when you knew fullwell the rules about cash being spent, right?

                • red2black

                  America’s a lot bigger than Britain, so it takes them a lot longer to knock on all those doors and annoy everybody.

              • Tickertapeguy

                One more thing
                How come you have NOTHING to say of the violent disruptions against the Trump rallies organized by move on . org and financed by Soros? shouldn’t you even show some concern of this kind of thuggish action in our Democracy? none?

  • John M

    A highly misinformed article really. Any fule no that the umbrella of the “Christian Church” in the USA includes a wide wider selection of the human gene pool than anywhere else, including lots of people who hate mexicans, jews, black people, the disabled, democrats, non americans and non christians.

    Fortunately the rest of the developed world is not over populated with such people, but the grain states in the US churn them out like turnips. Somehow the version of the bible they all read and recite includes hatred for all the people mentioned above, justifies adultery and bigotry against anyone who aint like them.

    The only thing these cretins have in common with European christians is the word “christian”. The similarities completely end there.

    • Rhoda Klapp

      Just wondering on what you base these assertions. They do not match what I see, living in the US temporarily but not Christian.

    • rationality

      ‘…and bigotry against anyone who aint like them.’

      The hypocrisy burns like a supernova.

    • GoJebus

      Well, that and the fact that they all believe in Jebus the sky monkey.

    • willoweepforme

      I can see by the cut of your jib that your a pirate called Trotsky.

  • MikePage

    Trump and Copeland certainly are birds of a feather, but I don’t consider either evangelical.

    People mix up the words evangelist and evangelical but they mean different things. For example, Vint Cerf is Google’s Chief Internet Evangelist. Does that make him an evangelical, too? (No.)

  • @PhilKean1

    .
    Trump has been able to succeed in America –

    – because the political and media establishment isn’t as left wing and strong as it is here in Britain.

    That is why – [a] – UKIP have had their electoral chances damaged at successive elections.
    And – [b] – a minority of desperate left wing citizens has protested at Trump rallies due to the American establishment’s inability to discredit him in the eyes of voters.
    .

    • Disqus Bolloqus

      Trump hasn’t su seeded yet. He may eventually do so, but needs to beat the Democat candidate in Presenditial election, and that is not a foregone conclusion.

      • Tickertapeguy

        If Trump faces Hillary it is easy
        If Trump faces Bernie it would be even easier.

  • James Chilton

    Evangelical Christians in this country are virtually invisible. You’re more likely to be get a bloke from Kleeneeze knocking at your door than get someone trying to “evangelise” you in the ten seconds it takes to shut the door.

    • Disqus Bolloqus

      And often they’re American missionaries

    • GoJebus

      I can shut my door quicker than that.

  • The Masked Marvel

    Trump hasn’t demonised or sneered at devout Christians, or based his campaign on social values which are anathema to them, and they’ve noticed. This is difficult for today’s bubble-dwelling journalists to wrap their heads round.

  • WatTylersGhost

    The “Building walls” accusation is ignorant in the extreme.
    Last time that I visited a border point between the USA and Mexico there were walls, razor wire and armed guards on both sides. The walls and fences already exist along the border where there are no rivers, it’s just that they are not properly policed. Illegal Mexicans have been known as “wet-backs” or “scratch-backs” for years for obvious reasons.
    All Trump is asking is that these borders are properly defended – where is the crime in that?

  • Thomas Katz

    All the Christians left in Britain are adding to it’s demise by Kowtowing to Moslems, starting with Welby

    • Dominic Stockford

      True Christians would never kow tow to another religion.

      • MikePage

        By definition.

  • WatTylersGhost

    “Christians” are there any left in Britain?

    • James Chilton

      Some, but not many of them are “evangelical” Christians.

    • flipkipper

      God Almighty, don’t keep us waiting and tell us!

  • irina palm

    The handwringers are deleting posts. They cannot stand it when a billionaire who is part of the establishment is criticised for speaking his dirty mind.

    • Gladysgmoran


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    • Ray Spring

      mine has just vanished!

      • Ray Spring

        Mine has resurfaced. Hallelujah!

  • Donafugata

    Desperate times call for desperate measures.

    I’ve never liked Trump, he’s arrogant and really not that bright but across Europe and in America there is now a dire need for solidly, right wing, pragmatism to rectify the damage done by fifty years of moral relativism and left wing idiocy.

    Right now there appears to be a unanimous attempt to exterminate the middle class. The globalists are planning a future for the stinking rich elite and a majority who can just about keep their heads above water.

    • WatTylersGhost

      it’s just like medieval times, there are the barons and their serfs and no middle class. Time for a peasants revolt – better luck this time……..

    • In2minds

      Trump – “and really not that bright” – So what do you think of Merkel?

      • Sue Smith

        As we say in Australia, “thick as two short planks”.

        • Sargon the bone crusher

          IN Mongolia, we say ‘ have a wee before it freezes off’.

        • Dicky14

          We say that in Yorkshire too but other than the weather, there’s not much difference!

      • mrmrsspence

        She’s in line for the Nobel Peace Prize, Trumpster ain’t.

    • Disqus Bolloqus

      Trump is part of the globalised elite

      • Tickertapeguy

        You are part of the cabal of elite

    • Sargon the bone crusher

      Maybe the conditions for degeneration are now permanent?

    • Alex

      Sounds like the kind of thing neoliberal capitalists do…

    • nutsingha

      Agree, but you are wrong on one thing – Trump has a near genius IQ.

      • Mow_the_Grass

        Source?

        • Hugh

          Donald J Trump.

          • Mow_the_Grass

            LOL

    • Anna Bananahammok

      And yet he seems much smarter than most politicians who have power today, wouldn’t you say?

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