Coffee House

Even without more defections, the pressure is back on Cameron

29 August 2014

29 August 2014

What will be the impact on the Conservative party of Douglas Carswell’s defection?

Even though there is some excitement this morning about other meetings that Ukip has held with Conservative MPs, it is worth pointing out that those meetings were firstly held a while ago, and secondly that a number of those MPs who did meet Stuart Wheeler decided not to meet Nigel Farage because that would have been a betrayal in itself of their party. Some did meet Farage, but decided not to make the leap. Carswell was one of those MPs who initially did not make that leap, so it is unwise to say that there will be no more defections. But when Coffee House spoke to most of those MPs yesterday, none of them had changed their mind as a result of this defection. This could change if the Clacton result is dreadful for the Tories, but also if David Cameron fails to manage his party well over the next few months – not just when it comes to European policy, but the other matters that Carswell cited in his statement.

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But even if Carswell’s defection is the last, he has still poured a bucket of ice over David Cameron’s autumn, when his relations with his party were still quite warm and cordial. Because the Tory MP has now increased the pressure on his old leader to articulate more of his intentions towards European reform. I reported in this week’s politics column – before Carswell had announced his shock defection – that eurosceptics already expected Cameron to set out his intentions for the renegotiation. And yesterday, even those MPs who were saying Carswell had made a mistake were pressuring Cameron to set out the detail of his reform. Bernard Jenkin said that on the World at One, and John Baron yesterday said ‘greater clarity as to which powers we are hoping to repatriate, should we win the next election, would do Number 10 no harm at all.’

There will also be increased pressure on Cameron to heal the split on the Right. Andrew Bridgen, another rebel who has in recent months declared his loyalty to the Prime Minister, tells me:

‘We have got to know that the Prime Minister has a walk away position, we have got to know what we want, what our red lines are on Europe.

‘It is sadly disappointing that so many people I’ve met in my time as a Conservative, that Conservative-minded people are voting Ukip. We need them back in the Conservative party, and Douglas has just left. David Cameron is the only one who could rectify that. He could still broker a deal with Ukip.’

Mark Pritchard, who yesterday argued that more defections were unlikely, tells me:

‘Hopefully the Conservative candidate will win the by-election, but if Douglas Carswell does win, it will underscore the potential risk of Conservative seats being lost to Ukip candidates at the general election, thereby helping Ed Miliband into Downing Street and denying the British people a European referendum. It would be self-defeating for all of us who want to fundamentally reconfigure Britain’s relationship with Europe.’

Some MPs are privately arguing that the Tories shouldn’t field a candidate against Carswell (who looks as though he will also be fighting the ex-Ukip candidate too). Others declare that while they like Carswell, he is dead to them politically, and they’ll fight him vigorously. Some believe Cameron should approach Carswell if he does win the by-election and strike up a coalition deal with him. Either way, this autumn is starting terribly for the Prime Minister on one of the few fronts he thought he could be confident of an easy ride: the party management problems are back, as well as international turmoil and all the other problems he’s been warding off all summer.


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Show comments
  • greggf

    “We have got to know that the Prime Minister has a walk away position….”

    Its worth repeating the observation that Cameron has already given his hand away in any negotiations with the EU by saying he’s in favour of staying in anyway.
    Since he apparently hasn’t been advised to keep his own counsel by his advisers, his deputy and the Civil Servants involved one must assume they are all of the same mind.

    Which doesn’t say much for Britain’s chances in any negotiations.

  • BoiledCabbage

    All this re-arranging of deckchairs. Europe is likely to have an energy crisis this winter, as payback for sanctions against Russia. Defence would then be the key issue on the agenda, as Europe’s energy import routes are vulnerable.

  • BoiledCabbage

    Cameron is paying the price for Jellyfishery – on the EU, on islamism – because he chose the easy option – coalition – back in 2010. Now he faces splitting the party – if a clutch of MPs desert for UKIP, thats him finished, overnight. Thats the rapido world we live in – there are no second chances.

    The rot has to stop and the public will demand that in 2015.

  • davidofkent

    I imagine that there will be some conservatives somewhere who actually believe David Cameron’s promise to renegotiate our EU terms and then call a referendum. They are probably part of a very small minority. David Cameron will not succeed in having anything worthwhile remitted to the UK; the EU leaders have the measure of him. I think he will ‘do a Chamberlain’.

  • Conway

    Mark Pritchard, who yesterday argued that more defections were unlikely …” That would be the Mark Pritchard who, according to the Telegraph, “offered to use his political contacts to set up business deals with foreign officials and ministers in return for potentially being paid hundreds of thousands of pounds”, would it? (article on 6th Nov 2013)

  • cambridgeelephant

    One question Isabel – as one of Cameron’s dwindling band of media cheerleaders you might be able to answer it – Is Cameron really happy with the state of the Conservative Party in the country, with the election less than a year away ?

    Membership more than halved. Activist base paltry even in staunch Tory seats- let alone marginals. Clacton is one of the few seats in the whole country where membership has actually risen of late.

    Hedge-fund Managers may stuff Cameron’s pockets with gold. But they don’t stuff envelopes come election time.

    • telemachus

      Look
      All questions become redundant
      We are seeing the Major-Style death throes of the Tories
      They will demit power for a generation

      • starfish

        John Major won an election….

        • telemachus

          And then imploded

  • careering_off

    The English language lacks a word for the feeling you’ll get waking up the morning after realising that you did such a good job the night before stuffing those who weren’t strongly enough on your side that they’ve been defeated by the guys who are definitely not on your side at all, and now they’re going to stuff you well and truly for five years and there’s nothing you can do about it, not even afford to move abroad to escape. Don’t worry, not all’s lost. You’ve got a few months left to invent a word. Or why not just buy one from the Germans?

    • Colonel Mustard

      The feeling is the pain of a bullet wound in the foot. But true enough there is not one word to describe that.

      • Conway

        What a sauce, Colonel! :)

    • telemachus

      Milibandism

    • Denis_Cooper

      But the English language has plenty of words for people who pretend to be on your side when really they are not on your side at all and they are just trying to string you along, again.

      • telemachus

        That is Cleggism

  • Shotfirbraons

    The reason David Cameron won’t do a deal with UKIP is that it will dead cert lose him the 2015 election. Although that’s looking increasingly unlikely anyway. But Miliband as PM? After the worst racist events of my lifetime in Labour Rotherham and the pro-Hitler rallies held by socialists and Islamists across Europe last month, how can anyone pledge loyalty to a Labour government?

    • telemachus

      I would be a little careful in posting lies and libel
      *
      Remember Miliband will be in power next May

      • Shotfirbraons

        Not sure whether meant seriously or ironically but your advice is good.

        • telemachus

          Deadly serious
          We are moving to the point of “holocaust denying” type posts

          • Shotfirbraons

            I don’t think my post was anything of the sort. It was based on reports of chants and placards at Gaza protests in about four different cities, all from reputable news sources. I also think that I have every right to be offended, although no doubt I exaggerated in my initial post. To the extent that you urge caution in the light of an incoming authoritarian government, though, you could not be more right, and I am grateful for the reminder. Now let’s get the f— out of here.

            • Colonel Mustard

              You really ought not to have capitulated to the Stalinist threats and intimidation from Labour’s resident bully, regulator and enforcer. That is why patients died in Mid-Staffs and Rotherham occurred.

              • ukfred

                When the system is as corrupt as the society in Britain, telling the truth is a criminal offence.

            • telemachus

              You may be offended but do not have the right to try to censor the posts and right to post of the forces of reason

          • evad666

            Rotherham shows we have now reached that point.

  • edithgrove

    We are a country without leadership. The last thing I remember Cameron saying was “we have to get those people of that hill” and then back to the beach. Nothing yet to turn our fury about Rotherham into positive action, in fact nothing at all. Nature abhors a vacuum.

    • telemachus

      You are correct
      The country cries out for sympathetic caring reasonable leadership
      *
      Stop writing about Cameron
      He will limp on until next May
      The key debate is when the reasonable leadership of the Reasonable Party will be supplanted by Charismatic Caring Leadership

      • Michele Keighley

        Saints be praised… another UKIP convert!

    • Alexandrovich

      You’ll have to excuse him – he’s still got to get back those kidnapped girls in Nigeria.

      • telemachus

        You know when an argument is bankrupt when posters have to resort to atrocity chestnuts

        • starfish

          Strangely, you raised Rotheram…

          • telemachus

            Could have said Oxford

            • Michele Keighley

              … but you didn’t.

        • Tom Allalone

          Atrocity chestnuts? So they didn’t happen? Or is it that you approve of mass rape and murder? You really are beneath contempt, you’ve finally attained sub human status

  • Colonel Mustard

    One of the most ludicrous oxymorons I have heard in my lifetime is to describe the Labour/Fabian/Common Purpose/Quangocracy nexus as the “forces of reason”.

    The “forces” bit is probably correct though. The nexus forces the helpless elderly in Mid-Staffs to drink dirty water from flower vases and it forces the victims of Rotherham to keep quiet.

  • Colonel Mustard

    In the light of the Labour party’s Rotherham scandal I recommend John Ware’s article on the Trojan Horse school plot in the latest Standpoint:-

    http://www.standpointmag.co.uk/features-september-14-plot-to-islamise-birmingham-schools-john-ware-trojan-horse

    The common element is the intimidation and fear of speaking out created by the Labour’s party’s divisive hate agenda and politicisation of multi-culturalism.

    The other element is the way Labour’s online activists lie to distort and misrepresent the truth to those who have not actually studied the primary source material of the actual reports.

    • ukfred

      So in every Labour-held seat, the forces of reason need to distribute a copy of Professor Jay’s report on Labour’s “care” for vulnerable girls in Rotherham along with a reminder that Shaun Wright,despite his culpability,resigned from the Labour party but refused to resign his £85,000 elected position.

  • Colonel Mustard

    Can’t see much wrong with this:-

    http://www.talkcarswell.com/home/its-time-for-change/2801

    Maybe as a supposedly conservative magazine (although with a host of highly active apparently sponsored Labour trolls) the Speccie should objectively examine some of the criticism of modern government rather than the valley girl prom-night classroom bubble stuff of worrying how Cameron and his clique will react.

    • echo34

      The speccy is just a CamFanzine now colonel.

      • telemachus

        The reasonable faction see Speccie as the most open minded website

        *

        Other than LabourList

        Hear Tristram there

        *

        “David Cameron is failing on social mobility – he and his government stand up only for a privileged few. Under the Tories, the attainment gap between disadvantaged children and the rest is increasing, millions of hardworking people are seeing their living standards go backwards and child poverty is set to increase.

        “Government policy is at odds with the Commission’s prescriptions. Alan Milburn, rightly, is very clear on the role for schools in ensuring children from deprived backgrounds get the exam results and broader character skills that they need to succeed. That vision is at the heart of Labour’s schools policy. By contrast, Cameron’s schools policy has done away with work experience and face-to-face careers advice, so important for young people, whilst ignoring the important role of children’s character development in schools.”

        *

        http://labourlist.org/2014/08/the-privileged-few-labours-response-to-figures-that-show-top-jobs-dominated-by-small-elite/

        • Frank

          Alan Milburn is a very odd kettle of fish. It is clear that he has the most immense chip on his shoulder (possibly justified by his inadequacies). Quite why he is still in position in this quango is bizarre.
          Interesting that the French think that elitism based on talent and learning is a very good thing. Clearly a shock to all those who favour trade union type advancement (like Milburn).
          Part of the problem in Britain is that we don’t have proper elitism, if we did, we wouldn’t have Cameron as PM. If we did, we wouldn’t have 63 councillors in Rotherham all denying all knowledge of everything. If we did, we wouldn’t have some of the worst led police forces in the western world. Ditto re the civil service and the NHS.

          • Colonel Mustard

            It’s bollox of course.

            http://order-order.com/2014/08/28/tristram-hunt-on-privilege/

            But the elitism being groomed is part and parcel of the post-democratic “leading beyond authority” vision where a cosy network of unelected, lucratively paid apparatchiks and bureaucrats will rule over us for their own good whilst telling us it is for ours.

            • Michele Keighley

              ‘Leading beyond authority’ – a Common Purpose meme – ,surely you have not been .. er.. ‘educated’; dear Colonel tell me it isn’t so!!

              • Colonel Mustard

                Certainly not! But they have ‘educated’ most of our civil service.

                • ukfred

                  Worryingly, Britain seems more and more like the dysfunctional society that Ayn Rand depicted in Atlas Shrugged than a healthy country.

          • telemachus

            Alan is a bit like IDS and Frank Field
            An independent thinker who understands where the Country should go
            You would do well to listen and learn

            • starfish

              And Carswell…..?
              Or is it just independent thinkers you approve of?

            • Frank

              I quite like Frank Field, he is an original even if he still lives with his mummy.
              Alan Milburn seems to have failed at most of what he has undertaken. I hope that he can find a new area of endeavour and hope for his sake that he can have some success in life.
              As for IDS, he probably means well, but getting his department of state to do anything is a major battle, let alone getting it to do something well.
              As for you, your uncle was a dentist in Munich? Are you even British (a devalued term, but I am being polite)?

              • telemachus

                A true Brit
                *
                Certainly not one of the little englanders of this parish

                • anyfool

                  I see that someone has dislodged the stone and set you free,

                  Three years ago I asked you if you would be comfortable with your children/grandchildren under the governance of Muslims, eventually you said yes.

                  Do you still hold that view
                  .

              • Tom Allalone

                His uncle was played by Laurence Olivier in ‘Marathon Man’

      • Colonel Mustard

        And below the blogs it seems to be owned by telemachus on behalf of the Labour party!

  • Callan

    My wife’s nephew by dint of hard work has just been accepted for one of England’s top universities. He is spending the summer with relatives in a small village, the population of which is entirely indigenous and has been welcomed into a number of homes and to various village functions. He has lost count now of the number of times he has been advised, when he gets his degree he should pursue his career abroad as “England is finished”.
    If this is the received opinion in a small village unaffected (at present) by mass immigration what is the thinking of the indigenous population at large?
    This should be food for thought for Cameron. But maybe his M.P.’s would rather keep the feelings of their constituents to themselves. After all Enoch Powell was man enough to broadcast the concerns of his constituents. He was not thanked for it.

    • telemachus

      Anyone who takes that advice is better away from our country re-energised by the waves of foreign expertise
      *
      Just as it was after the withdrawal of Roman support in AD 410

    • Frank

      Without in any way wishing to be rude, do you seriously think that Mr Cameron gives tuppence for what the population of England thinks? He seems to be utterly deaf to a huge range of issues and seems to disregard anything which doesn’t match his opinion. It is hard to tell if this is mainly stupidity, or some kind of mental condition (ie a form of over-arching arrogance).
      As for the MPs in his party, they seem to be sunk in apathy. The fact that they are faced with one of the weakest labour parties for decades and yet are still below them in the polls should tell these tory MPs that something is profoundly wrong with the tory party message, but none of them (bar Carswell) seem to have the courage to do anything.
      As for the labour party, they are an utter disgrace and I seriously hope that they can sack their entire front bench and rediscover a sense of ethics and proper political purpose (and not assume, like the asinine Yvette Cooper, that simply parroting party garbage is genuine politics).

      • telemachus

        The fact that they are faced with one of the weakest labour parties for decades
        *
        I love this complacency
        It will serve the forces of reason well next May

        • Frank

          Listen pea-brain, if you think Miliband, Balls, Harman, etc represent a strong political party, then you need to get out more and talk to normal people.
          By the time we get to the bottom of the Rotherham scandal, the labour party may well be a more ethical and stronger party. In the interim, the impact of its core corruption and loss of ethics is visible for all to see.

          • telemachus

            In every political party you will find rogue elements

            Particularly at the Council level

            The most serious is the undermining of our democracy by gerrymandering

            http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-89909/Law-Lords-order-Dame-Shirley-pay-27-million.html

            • Colonel Mustard

              Labour know all about gerrymandering and it has a long pedigree in the party.

              It is perhaps worth remembering the only occasion in the last 100 years when there has been direct political interference in the work of the Boundary Commission.

              In 1969 the Commission finished a review. Since the last review in 1950 there had been huge population moves and it was generally thought that the new boundaries would favour the Tories by between 10-20 seats. The law was very clear; the then Home Secretary, Jim Callaghan, had to put the changes to Parliament in the form of a series of Orders.

              Labour had a huge majority following their landslide in the 1966 election so Callaghan hatched an utterly cynical plan. The necessary Orders would be placed before the Commons but no further action would be taken. The excuse used was that local government boundaries were under review and it would be better to wait until they had been decided before changing constituency boundaries.

              This would have been squalid enough in itself, but in London the local boundaries were not being changed so Callaghan decided to implement the Boundary Commission recommendations there and in four very large constituencies. Readers will not be astonished to hear that in all of these places the changes were expected to favour Labour.

              These proposals caused outrage and the Lords blocked the Bill which would have implemented only the recommendations which favoured Labour. Labour’s main aim, however, to block the boundary changes had been achieved.

              The election when it came in 1970 was fought on 1950 boundaries with constituencies ranging from Birmingham Ladywood with 18,771 voters to Billericay with 123,297. Happily even after this gerrymandering they still lost.

              Callaghan was said to be ashamed of this incident in later life and his official biographer describes it as a ‘simple gerrymandering exercise by the Labour Government’, ‘a cynical partisan manoeuvre’ and ‘pragmatic delay, untrammelled by principle’.

              • Mynydd

                What actions did Mrs Thatcher take when she came to power in respect to your so called Labour gerrymandering, nothing absolutely nothing. All those wasted years.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  My “so called Labour gerrymandering”?

                  Which part of “Callaghan was said to be ashamed of this incident in later life and his official biographer describes it as a ‘simple gerrymandering exercise by the Labour Government’, ‘a cynical partisan manoeuvre’ and ‘pragmatic delay, untrammelled by principle’.”

                  did you fail to understand or was it just your usual inbred Labour attempt to lie, misrepresent and obfuscate?

                  Trying to blame Thatcher for that is risible, even for a Labour doofus like you. It probably escaped your eagle eye that Labour lost anyway so there was nothing for Thatcher to correct.

                • Mynydd

                  If Labour lost it blows your gerrymandering out of the water. She did nothing get over it.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  Listen doofus, it is not “my” gerrymandering but Mr Callaghan’s gerrymandering. I know that you are as thick as mince but you can read can’t you?

                  Do you understand the difference between intentions and outcomes? Oh, no, of course not, you are a Labour doofus.

                • Roger Hudson

                  Miliband makes Big Jim look very good.

            • starfish

              Indeed
              Shame your ‘socialist’ colleagues are so keen to take advantage

              • telemachus
                • Colonel Mustard

                  The lies never stop. From that linked article:-

                  “The verdict

                  We’d stop short of calling the move to cut the number of seats “gerrymandering” from the Tories, not least because the Boundary Commission is independent.”

                  In 2010 the Conservatives won 7% more votes than Labour but gained only 49 more seats.

                  In 2005 Labour won less than 3% more votes than the Conservatives but gained 139 more seats.

                  The net result is that the majority of conservative English people are ruled by Labour domination of a handful of great cities into which they have imported thousands of voters and groomed a supplicant client base.

                • starfish

                  and in which postal vote fraud is conducted on epic levels

                • dado_trunking

                  Conservative and Ukip voters are such selfish barstewards not even man enough to help granny fill in the postal ballot paper? Wow, you never stop learning ever more tripe on a daily basis.

                • the viceroy’s gin

                  …your army of sockpuppets have no trouble filling out their ballots, eh lad?

                • Mynydd

                  If you have evidence of postal vote fraud it’s your duty to report it.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  A lot of Labour influenced and influencing people had a duty to report the goings on in Rotherham.

                  Labour preside over wrongdoing and covering it up, from Rotherham and Falkirk to Mid-Staffs.

                • dado_trunking

                  Your society is inept and falling apart, Colonel.
                  Take note: your banksters ruined your lives for you. Never forget that. whenever you do, I will be there to remind you.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  It is not my society. It is the society created by socialist weasels like you.

                • global city

                  This is the Blob, the long march through the institutions, cultural Marxism, gerrymandering and statism all rolled into one.

                • dado_trunking

                  How is that possible – you imported … correction, Labour did … ‘thousands of (Labour) voters’ into say Manchester? How did they do that? Did the border check their affiliation before admitting them?

                  Nah matey, none of that happened – so you are talking tripe. If you cannot attract newcomers with sane policy and beliefs (are you saying Conservatives cannot?), then you will frankly get what you deserve.

                  The fact is that you have lost half your paying supporters since Cameron took power. Did they all leave the country to become immigrants in another place? No. So what happened? You changed as much as the rest of the nation did! YOU changed. Man up, Colonel.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  No, I’m not talking tripe.

                  http://www.workpermit.com/news/2014-06-24/survey-immigration-changes-balance-of-uk-politics

                  Labour knew this very well when they opened the floodgates. Research into voting patterns conducted for the Electoral Commission after the 2005 general election found that 80 per cent of Caribbean and African voters had voted Labour, while only about 3 per cent had voted Conservative. The Asian vote was split about 50 per cent for Labour, 10 per cent Conservatives and 15 per cent Liberal Democrats.

                  So it is you who is talking tripe. As usual.

                • dado_trunking

                  So you offer z e r o to immigrants. Hear hear, my words.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  So, you can’t even admit when you are wrong.

                  And don’t talk tripe. After Thatcher came to power in 1979 immigration dropped from approx 125,000 to 75,000 by 1981-82 then rose steadily to a peak of just under 200,000 in 1989-90. There were no floodgates opened, up North or anywhere else until New Labour decided to rub the right’s nose in diversity and import new voters. From 1997 immigration climbed steeply to a peak of 300,000 in 2000-2001 then oscillated between 275,000 and 300,000 for three years until climbing sharply again to almost 500,000 by 2004-05.

                • dado_trunking

                  … because the North was a brown and unpleasant land by then. FATCHA failed England big time. There were no people in the North of England then and outside the London bubble the country is certainly not full today. You just don’t want to know.

                  One of my former clients just released another 1,000 flats/units in *one* project in Manchester – why are they doing that, how come they can do that right in the centre of the city?
                  Because there is loads of space!

                • Mynydd

                  Citizens from Commonwealth countries resident in the UK have the vote, so are these included in your imported thousands of voters, and what about those EU citizens, with the right to vote, how have come since 2010.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  Who knows? Who cares?

                  http://www.workpermit.com/news/2014-06-24/survey-immigration-changes-balance-of-uk-politics

                  Research into voting patterns conducted for the Electoral Commission after the 2005 general election found that 80% of Caribbean and African voters had voted Labour, while only about 3 per cent had voted Conservative. The Asian vote was split about 50% for Labour, 10% Conservatives and 15% Liberal Democrats.

                • girondas2

                  Showing your face here again are you telemachus, despite your party’s disgusting behaviour in Rotherham?

            • UKSteve

              So you think a 20-year old story is more important and relevant than mass kiddy-raping in Rotheram?

              Yep, you’re definitely Labour all right.

          • Mynydd

            Please explain why they are top of the public opinion polls.

            • Colonel Mustard

              Because they have bribed, suborned and imported a core of brain dead voters.

            • Tom M

              “the majority always votes for the candidates promising them the most benefits from the public treasury ”

              Quote: Alexander Fraser Tytler

              • Alan Read-Lewis

                That’s gerrymandering and is supposed to be illegal.

                And its why Britain will eventually go bust. Too many scroungers.

            • UKSteve

              Currently. I wouldn’t gloat about being the flea-ridden old nag winning a 3-horse race (of only knacker’s yard-bait) by a nose too much if I were you.

              Give it time. Polls put Neil Kinnock into No. 10.

          • Roger Hudson

            They can be (are) the most pathetic party but the current voting and boundary system can deliver government to Labour with a popular vote in the 30+% range, a UKIP Tory tussle will let Labour crawl through to undemocratic ‘victory’.

        • ButcombeMan

          You are back.

          Your absence from the debates about what Common Purpose and Labour, have together done, to child protection in Rotherham, was noted.

          Maybe just maybe, UKIP will now slaughter Labour in Rotherham, at the general election.

          • Ken

            I can just see the election posters now – “Vote Labour, we’re not yet done covering this up”

        • Wessex Man

          oh no you are back, I was sure you emigrated to the French Socialist Utopia, don’t tell me there wasn’t enough food banks to go around!

          • LadyDingDong

            Do you not find it interesting that there has been an absence of these leftard trolls for 3 weeks and suddenly they are all back on one thread? Having said that, I have missed them – if ever I doubt my conservatism, reading these brainless morons reminds me of what any future Labtard government would bring.

            • Colonel Mustard

              He boasts of chumminess with the deputy editor. I don’t know if that is really true but the editorial direction of this blog makes it at least believable.

          • Tom Allalone

            It’s more likely that Telemachus’ doctors decided to give care in the community one last try. It’s not working.

          • uberwest

            Maybe he cancelled that plan when he found out that the frogs were all headed here

        • UKSteve

          Well, it doesn’t surprise me you’re still in Disqus and still spouting rubbish. Here, you are whistling while walking past the graveyard.

          Milliband is a pathetically weak and vulnerable leader by popular consensus, and 64% of the party members left between 2001 – and 2005.

          Labour: In power twice since 1970, bankrupted the country twice, invaded Iraq causing the deaths of 800,000 people, massively destabilising the world geopolitically, and causing terrorist actions on UK’s mainland. Then opening the floodgates to massive and uncontrolled UK immigration to rub the “Right’s noses in diversity”.

          Quite an achievements list in 40 years. Complacency, you say?

      • Callan

        No offence taken. Wouldn’t argue with any of that sir, “over- arching arrogance”. Nice turn of phrase, mirrors exactly the persona of the unlovely Soubry. Oh I do hope UKIP take her on. I would give a weeks pay to see her in the queue at the job centre. Chin chin.

        • UKSteve

          I’ve said since 2010 Broxtowe (Notts.) should be a prime UKIP target seat, she has a 376 majority!

          • Callan

            Thanks for the info sir. hope UKIP have indeed set their sights on Broxtowe.

            • UKSteve

              Yes, although it’s not in their top ten, but It’s not just about small majorities. Soubry seems to have foot-in-mouth disease. Perhaps she should have stuck to news reading :-/ ?

    • Reldnahc

      Well, they probably think differently, seeing as they don’t live an insular, isolated existence in an entirely indigenous quaint little village that probably all think Britain has ‘gone to the dogs’ or whatever they like to say now. Nice of them to give your wife’s nephew such an optimistic vision of the future, though

      • telemachus

        For all the cynicism I can say without shadow of a doubt that there is a bright future
        Recent re-energisation and renewal of our gene pool will take us forward to the glorious twenties

        • Harold Angryperson

          Fir Corfe Hugh Wayne Kerr

          • telemachus

            Interestingly Hugh Wayne Biggs was a friend of my Uncle, a dentist
            They worked together for a number of years in Munich
            *
            Do not know Corfe

        • Holly

          Nice to see your usual.
          You have to keep your chin up somehow I suppose.
          Plod on….

          • Colonel Mustard

            “Recent re-energisation and renewal of our gene pool”

            Labour speak for genocide by stealth.

          • Wessex Man

            Plod on after his pals antics in Rotherham he should hang his head in shame anf never darken this place again with his presence!

        • Tom Allalone

          There is one immigrant group that isn’t going to do anything to renew the gene pool owing to its tradition of cousin marriage and refusal to marry out – and raping children doesn’t count. Your core voters I believe

        • UKSteve

          From what I’ve heard, and has been posted here, it’s more of a gene puddle.

      • Callan

        Haven’t been to Londonistan for a while. Must ask around when next I visit.

        • Wessex Man

          I have and now don’t look forward to going back.

      • Colonel Mustard

        “…they don’t live an insular, isolated existence in an entirely indigenous quaint little village that probably all think Britain has ‘gone to the dogs’ or whatever they like to say now”

        Is that wrong then? Is that not diversity of existence and opinion? Would you like to change it and stop them choosing to live like that, thinking it and saying it? Now how, one wonders, might you achieve that?

        Of course. You must know better.

        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/6418456/Labour-wanted-mass-immigration-to-make-UK-more-multicultural-says-former-adviser.html

        And presumably by turning England into concreted urban sprawl and huge linked conurbations of segregated warring humanity .

        How lucky we all are that people like you with such an optimistic vision of the future are so omnipotent and vocal in our public life.

        • Reldnahc

          Not entirely sure what you’re on about, I think you got a little carried away at the end there?

          I’m just trying to understand the mindset of a group of people whose only advice for a young person starting uni is ‘England’s finished’. I can only imagine they don’t actually know that much about England, maybe because they live an insular, isolated existence – which is entirely up to them, but also, in this case, a bit of a shame really.

          • Colonel Mustard

            “I think you got a little carried away at the end there?”

            No, I didn’t. It would be nice if I had though.

          • the viceroy’s gin

            You should check some of the meta polling data. You might be astonished, but these attitudes aren’t confined to the few in insular villages, etc .

          • ukfred

            I live in a city in the north of the country and one of my neighbours has advised his son,who has recently graduated in exactly the same terms.

    • Wessex Man

      David Cameron will never accept he’s wrong, the mood of the nation has changed but the the Westminster Village and their bubble of loyal Correspondents/Cheerleaders such as dear Isabel carry on as if it’s the very early start to the century!

    • John Wilford

      Why don’t these indigenous relatives of yours vote for UKIP or BNP to put an end to mass immigration?

    • Conway

      You cannot expect Cameron to consult the plebs, surely?

    • tjamesjones

      Yes, so the people least affected by mass immigration are those most concerned with it. What lesson could we possibly take from this? Oh, I don’t know, I’m a kipper. But London does seem awfully popular with the young folk these days, doesn’t it.

      • Callan

        Why should it not, it is still the Nation’s capital, it is a magnet and so it should be. Just tell them to be careful who they speak to, where they go and to keep their possessions close. And don’t cross the road using the underpasses and don’t get into any taxi other than a licensed hackney cab late at night. I could go on, but you get the picture.

        • tjamesjones

          yes, sounds like you worked in the tourist office circa 1982, the world has changed – try googling “uber”. London is a magnet not just within the UK, but also across Europe and the wider world. There are few more popular destinations for young persons like the one advised above to “quit England”. Perhaps the kippers ought to quit England.

    • tempusfugitdunnit

      Very interesting post and very revealing indeed. Very sinister subtext. Merciffully, your wife’s nephew will, by dint of encountering fellow students from around the world, have his mind detoxified in due course. “England is finished, eh?” We are British, sir, and the arrival of brown faces and the sound of Polish plumbers will not make us any the poorer for that. Powell was an articulatre rabble rouser. I am delighted, as a white, middle class professional Brit, that the wonderful Soubry kebabbed the awful Farage on QT, and showed him up for what he truly is. This current hubris around UKIP will, pass. There will be no UKIP MPs (note there is no comma needed), apart from Carwell’s brief stint in Clacton.
      The whimpering of Little Englanders will fade, and Britain will be confident again to reveal itself as it always has been – tolerant, creative, quirky and an example of how a great and civilised country should be.

  • Blindsideflanker

    Cameron has been the architect of his own misfortune.

    After Lisbon he said he wouldn’t let matters rest there, but did just that.

    Instead of responding to the EUsceptic mood of the country, he brings arch EUfanatics like Clarke and Hesletine into Government, and goes out of his way to insult the EUsceptics.

    He had his modernisers boast the right had been marginalised with his Libdem pact, and suggested they had been permanently marginalised if they could link up with the Libdems.

    When UKIP came snapping at his heals , he still failed to properly respond to people’s concerns , and gave the most EU fanatical department of state, the Foreign Office, the very department that has negotiated away our sovereignty, the job of reviewing EU competencies. Not surprisingly they come back with a report saying , Problem? What Problem?

    In the meantime the public goes and votes UKIP the biggest party we send to the EU parliament.

    And Cameron wonders, having been so wrong for so long, why some of his backbenchers loose patience?

    • Colonel Mustard

      And one of their biggest mistakes has been to assume that their own city slicker metro-centric definition of what constitutes the political centre ground is shared by middle England.

      Carswell represents a true modernisation of politics. Cameron’s version is just left-appeasing hand wringing and capitulation in the hope of a few more votes from people who still hate him anyway.

      • Mynydd

        Carswell who’s Carswell, before yesterday I didn’t know, and I suspect most others didn’t know, who he was.

        • Colonel Mustard

          Mynydd who’s Mynydd? Oh yes he’s that irritating Labour doofus who insists on hanging onto my comments like a haemorrhoid.

          The fact that you don’t know who Carswell is shows how thick you are. As thick as mince.

    • telemachus

      Cameron has been the architect of his own misfortune.
      *
      Indeed so
      But that was when he got into bed with Clegg
      His only course that would have recognised the interests of the UK would have been to let Clegg support a minority Brown Government
      That way we would not have delayed the recovery by withdrawal of Capital Support to industry when Osborne got to work

      • Alexandrovich

        ” He
        was no man of action; he was not even an orator of torrential
        eloquence, sweeping the masses along in the rushing noise and
        foam of a great enthusiasm. With a more subtle intention,
        he took the part of an insolent and venomous evoker of sinister
        impulses which lurk in the blind envy and exasperated vanity of
        ignorance, in the suffering and misery of poverty, in all the
        hopeful and noble illusions of righteous anger, pity, and
        revolt. The shadow of his evil gift clung to him yet like
        the smell of a deadly drug in an old vial of poison, emptied now,
        useless, ready to be thrown away upon the rubbish-heap of things
        that had served their time.”

        Joseph Conrad knew your type.

        • telemachus

          Remember Al Qaeda has been supplanted and trumped by ISIL
          You should not peddle such utterances here

          • Colonel Mustard

            Why shouldn’t he? Why should you think it up to you to decide what can and can’t be uttered here?

          • Alexandrovich

            “You may be offended but do not have the right to try to censor the posts…”
            Do as I say, not as I do. Typical Labour.

            • telemachus

              I am heartened to see that you understand

              • Alexandrovich

                Oh I understand alright, you obfuscating little birdbrain.

        • Colonel Mustard

          Ah, Conrad.

          On Socialism: “All ambitions are lawful except those which climb upward on the miseries or credulities of mankind.”

          On the Labour Party: “The scrupulous and the just, the noble, humane, and devoted natures; the unselfish and the intelligent may begin a movement – but it passes away from them. They are not the leaders of a revolution. They are its victims.”

          On Carswell: “You can’t, in sound morals, condemn a man for taking care of his own integrity. It is his clear duty.”

          • Mynydd

            How come Conrad can comment “On Caswell” when he died in 1924.

            • Colonel Mustard

              How come you are so thick? As thick as mince.

        • Michele Keighley

          Sounds a bit like Alex Salmond!

      • ButcombeMan

        Clegg & Cameron together, get enormous credit from me for only one thing, saving Britain from the economically illiterate, utterly dysfunctional and “psychologically flawed”, creator,
        of “The Big Brown Mess”

        • Mynydd

          But they haven’t saved us. Do you not know that we still have a deficit of £100bn, they have double the National Debt, and the return on my life long savings is below the rate of inflation. Get real.

          • ButcombeMan

            They have saved us from Brown & Balls.

            Things could have been even worse.

            If you are holding much cash, you can expect to get next to nothing.

            I only have investments which pay reasonable dividend return on capital and the chance of capital appreciation.

  • telemachus

    What about the ongoing Rotheram debacle
    What about Ukraine
    What about ISIL

    • Airey Belvoir

      Rotherham was all about the Left’s obsession with political correctness, Common Purpose,the wonders of multiculturism, and a corrupt, spineless Labour Council who put their own salaries and pensions above all else.

      • telemachus

        Rotherham was about evil men who targeted poor girls
        See Guardian G2 yesterday

        • Colonel Mustard

          There was a bit more to it than that. From the report page 35:-

          “5.5 In this part of the report, we have not specified the ethnicity of the victims or the perpetrators. In a large number of the historic cases in particular, most of the victims in the cases we sampled were white British children, and the majority of the perpetrators were from minority ethnic communities. They were described generically in the files as ‘Asian males’ without precise reference being made to their ethnicity.”

          http://www.rotherham.gov.uk/downloads/file/1407/independent_inquiry_cse_in_rotherham

        • Alexsandr

          WRONG
          Rotherham was about the government agencies, like the police and social servces, turning a blind eye to widescale abuse by men, mostly of pakistani origin.
          Yes the abusers should be brought to book, bual so those who aided and abbetted them should be

        • the viceroy’s gin

          Rotheram is, not was, is, about you fascists, laddie.

    • jamesbarn

      And what about the Butler Sloss enquiry, has this been swept under the carpet?

  • zanzamander

    Here’s a novel idea, why don’t the entire Tory front bench, including the PM, defect to Labour. Imagine, no one will be able to tell the difference!

  • james allen

    Serves him right really. You can’t go through life simply telling people what they want to hear; eventually they need action.

    • telemachus

      Cameron gave action
      Carswell is a spineless wrecker
      And without moral Compass
      Clacton will respond in kind
      *
      Having said all that the forces of reason delight

      • Tom Allalone

        Current odds on a Carswell win 1/5

    • maliniok

      Simply telling people what they want to hear? That’s what Nigel Farage has been doing all his political life!

      • telemachus

        And now pandering to the base instincts of the non thinking skinhead Tebbit followers with his increasing racialist stance

      • the viceroy’s gin

        Farage believes it, though.

        Poshboy Dave believes only that he should rule.

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