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Coffee House

Listen: Could this George Galloway speech save the Union?

25 June 2014

3:49 PM

25 June 2014

3:49 PM

Unionists frequently lament the lack of passionate figures on the Better Together campaign, able to take on Alex Salmond. Thankfully, there is at least one such person — George Galloway. His nine minute speech at last night’s Spectator debate is one of the most forceful and convincing arguments we’ve heard so far against Scottish Independence. Listen to the audio in full here:

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And here are some of the highlights of what Galloway had to say:

‘We were people together on a small piece of rock with three hundred years of common history, and that’s what they want to break up.’

‘This is the first time ever that people in a small country where everyone speaks the same language are being asked to break up, and break up on the basis that they don’t have a currency to use. There will be no pound.’

‘The difference is we have come together temporarily at a moment of national peril. The nationalists on the other hand are permanently together for they have only one purpose, to persuade you that Brian Souter, the gay-baiting billionaire, funder of their campaign, is someone more worthy of looking up to than J.K.Rowling.’

“I am tired of being called a quisling, or a traitor…I’ll go wherever I like in these islands or anywhere else and speak my mind.’

‘There’ll be havoc if you vote yes in September, havoc in Edinburgh and throughout the land, and you’ll break the hearts of many others too.’

‘Who wants to mortgage their, and their children’s future on a finite resource that will soon be finished and the price of which is simply incalculable?’

‘They want you to re-fight a battle seven hundred years ago between two French speaking Kings with Scottish people on both sides. I prefer to remember a rather more recent battle…If we had not stood, but capitulated, like others had done before us, we’d be having this meeting this evening in German, if we were going to have it at all.’

Read Alex Massie’s report of last night’s debate here.

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