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Blogs Coffee House

Don’t apologise for holding The Sun, Ed

13 June 2014

1:14 PM

13 June 2014

1:14 PM

I’d like to say that when I’m low and feel I can’t go on anymore that it’s the thought of a child’s smile or a better future for humanity that gets me through, or maybe one of those inspiring Maya Angelou quotes people were sharing last week: but to be honest, it’s actually that picture of Ed Miliband trying to eat a bacon sandwich.

I know that certain Labour commentators are unhappy with Ed’s performance, and many Tories are concerned about him actually running the country, but his visual mishaps do provide such cheer during these dark periods. A friend of mine brought a copy of the bacon picture to his 83-year-old father in hospital, who had suffered a stroke, and said his dad laughed so much he almost had another one. Whether it’s spilling a cup of tea or trying to look casual while ordering some cheese, Ed can’t fail to bring a smile to my sad face. Then there is the ‘f*** off beaker’ thing on Twitter; I know it’s childish, but it’s pretty funny.

Ed Miliband strikes me as so likeable – far more so than Cameron or Osborne – precisely because he’s so unsuited towards being prime minister and should be working in the nearest PC World. Part of me looks forward to his victory next year just for the daily ROFL, especially the hilarious comedy value of Ed on the international stage, meeting the representatives of less ironic nations. Putin will probably crush his hand and mutter in Russian to his henchmen, something to the effect of ‘he is like woman’. Or something.

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Ed’s latest photo op was appearing with a copy of the Sun, cheering on ‘our boys’. The picture looked totally natural, of course, rather reminiscent of those British citizens being ‘well looked after’ by Saddam Hussein in 1990.

Miliband grew up in a household where Marxist theory was debated over breakfast, and while football may be an interest, I suspect he cares rather less about it than the typical Sun reader does. Again, this makes him quite attractive, especially when faced with the moronic demands of the (public school-dominated) tabloid media for him to be more ‘normal’ ie interested in reality TV and sport.

Big deal, you might think; the leader of the opposition posing with the country’s largest paper ahead of the biggest sporting tournament – that’s sort of the hoops they have to jump through.

But, no, no one can do or say anything today without someone taking offence somewhere, in this case seeing it as a personal attack on their city or relatives, and even demanding his resignation.

Does anyone genuinely think that Ed Miliband showing his support for the England team with a copy of the Sun in 2014 is in any way a comment on the Sun’s editorial decisions of 1989, made by people who almost certainly don’t even work for the paper anymore? Are people who demand apologies because their group has been slurred really offended, or do they want to work themselves up about it and show their righteousness? And would they do this if politicians and public figures caved in every single time some person took offence on the slightest pretext?

One day, and this is a day I pray for like a religious fundamentalist waiting for end times, a politician will just turn around and say those three magic words: I’m not sorry.

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