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Blogs

A Valentine Day special – Britain’s cheapest ever divorce

14 February 2014

12:10 PM

14 February 2014

12:10 PM

You know, when the pope went on in his recent encyclical about how the family ‘is experiencing a profound cultural crisis’ he wasn’t half right. His reflection that ‘the individualism of our postmodern and globalized era favours a lifestyle which … distorts family bonds’ came to mind when I got this very special Valentine’s press release from a money saving website. It’s offering your cheapest ever divorce for £36, so long as you apply today.

I always thought, myself, that no fault divorce was a really bad idea in undermining the contractual character of marriage, but I never thought that the commodification of the end of marriage – cheapening the bond in every sense – would follow it quite so quickly.
Anyway, here it is, for advocates of consumer capitalism to savour on Valentine’s Day:


 

Britain’s cheapest ever divorce – a Valentine Day special

February 14 is regarded as one of the most romantic days of the year but if your relationship has begun to wane take heart – you can now get a Valentine divorce for just £36.

The ultimate quickie divorce is available for one day only by accessing an exclusive voucher code through money saving website PromotionalCodes.org.uk.

The site is offering the groundbreaking deal, believed to be the cheapest ever in the UK, to all separating couples provided they apply on 14 February.

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With the average cost of a divorce in Britain around £3,000 bosses expect demand for the deal to be high with hundreds of out of love couples expected to grab the one off discount.

Growing numbers of marriages are calling time on Valentine’s Day and divorce lawyers are gearing up for a bumper February.

They claim the pressure of being the perfect couple on this day is too much for some to bear and they’re unable to meet the romanticised ideal.

The £36 DIY divorce includes all your legal forms, a guide on how to fill them out and a completed divorce petition.

One divorced shopper said: “It’s always sad when marriages break up but it’s a fact of life that many do come to an end and who wants to waste unnecessary cash on all the legalities?

“To be able to save hundreds of pounds on the cost of a break-up is amazing. Who’d have thought you’d be able to find a voucher code to make it less painful where it counts – your bank balance.”

Darren Williams from PromotionalCodes.org.uk said that the discount code is to ease the financial pain of a break up and to help couples trapped in unhappy relationships to move forward.

He said: “Marriage is hard work, and never more so than on the ‘special’ occasions like birthdays, anniversaries and Valentine’s Day. There is huge pressure on married couples, particularly those with children, to make it work. That isn’t always possible and in those situations, the break can mean a fresh start and a happier life for everyone involved.

“It’s one of those issues that people shy away from talking about or try to keep hidden however with divorce rates rising year on year couples shouldn’t be afraid to talk about it and should be supported in whatever way they need.

“We want to offer our users the best deal on an online divorce and this code gives them the chance to ease some of the financial pressures associated with splitting up.

“Of course it’s sad when marriages end but if it’s possible to ease the financial pain a little then that has to be positive.”

He said he is expecting to see a rise in people searching for divorce codes around Valentine’s Day, and if the code is a success, bring it back for other key times.

“There are times of the year that are tough for married couples and these can be the trigger to call time on their marriage. Among those are the wedding season, Christmas and New Year and post summer holiday.”

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