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Coffee House

George Mudie’s gloomy tunes suggests that Ed Miliband is under increasing pressure

1 August 2013

4:15 PM

1 August 2013

4:15 PM

George Mudie is the Labour Party’s answer to Marvin the Paranoid Android. He gave an interview to The World At One earlier today which was so morose in tone that I think he must, as a matter of urgency, have a meal at the Restaurant At the End of Universe.

Yet, through the fog of his despair, Mudie (a seasoned agitator of the Blair and Brown era) shot some cruel barbs at Ed Miliband. Words like ‘confused’ and ‘hesitant’ dotted his spiel, together with rambling rhetorical questions like:

‘Do you know, ‘cos I don’t, our position on welfare, do you know our position on education, do you know our genuine position on how we’d run the health service?’ 

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The Tories have got very excited about this stramash, and have issued a lengthy communique containing all of the embarrassing quotes from ‘a senior and respected Labour MP’.

Ho, ho. I doubt that we should take old gloomy Mudie quite so seriously; but, plainly, the recent Tory revival has unsettled the once disciplined Labour benches, which is not good news for Ed Miliband at this stage of the parliament.

Readers can make up their own minds by listening to Mudie here:

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