Coffee House

Made in Glasgow: the new Iranian president, Hassan Rouhani

15 June 2013

15 June 2013

It’s official – Hassan Rouhani has been declared the new President of Iran with 51pc of the vote. He’s a cleric, a moderate and a polyglot (speaking English, German, French, Russian and Arabic). “Let’s end extremism,” he said during a campaign speech. “We have no other option than moderation.” He took swipes at the Basij, the Islamist morality police who go around asking women to veil up. He’s spoken about releasing political prisoners, and lifting internet censorship. But what jumps out from his CV is that he’s a Glasgow graduate – and very proud of it. He even boasted about it in his campaign video.

GlasgowCali

In this video, he cheekily truncated his alma mater to “Glasgow University”. The ensuing controversy seems to have established that he studied at the old Glasgow Polytechnic in the 1970s. But he seems to have enjoyed Glasgow so much – understandably – that after his MPhil in law he returned to study for a PhD in Constitutional Law. (The 1999 graduation list is here: he then went by the name of Hassan Feridon).

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Glasgow Tech only became Caledonian University in 1993 so his PhD study appears to coincide with his tenure as secretary of Iran’s supreme national security council. That’s impressive. Personally, I’d rather do this job from Glasgow than Tehran. What better vantage point to view the world than the kebab houses and hostelries of Sauchiehall Street? Where better to hone skills in diplomacy? (He has been Iran’s lead nuclear negotiator). And you can’t accuse him of reveling in Western decadence – life expectancy is lower in Glasgow than in Iran.

All told, the victory of this Glasgow graduate bodes well for Iranian politics. Those armed with a Scottish education have made excellent leaders of foreign countries. Canada had John Buchan and modern Hong Kong was pretty much invented by John Cowperthwaite who applied the ideas of Adam Smith to make this tiny island as rich (per capita) as America. The American constitution, famously, can be traced back to the Scottish Enlightenment.

I suspect that Rouhani’s time in Glasgow would have made him disinclined to believe in the “clash of civilizations” narrative so beloved of the Iranian religious crackpots who seldom venture outside the country. Glasgow has a sizeable Muslim population, and stands as one of Europe’s most successful examples of integration. The story of Glasgow Muslims is more Ae Fond Kiss than My Son The Fanatic. Once you’ve eaten halal haggis at a Burns supper, as I hope Rouhani had the chance to, you see the truth behind the Scots saying: ‘we’re all Jock Tamson’s bairns’ – i.e. we’re not so different. Glasgow is a globally-minded, metropolitan city. The Chancellor of Caledonian Uni is a muslim: the Bangladeshi economist, Muhammad Yunus.

The principles of the Scottish Enlightenment – limited government, individual liberty, faith in the people – pretty much forged the modern world and are much-needed in Iran. I’m not saying that Rouhani is Adam Smith in a headscarf, but he is globally-minded and won after a campaign advocating equal rights for women, free trade (or the lifting of sanctions anyway) and in general limiting the state’s power to interfere in people’s private lives. A 64-year-old academic whose CV says he has published “about 100 books and scientific papers” is less likely to go around shouting “death to Israel” than his rabble-rousing predecessor. Let’s hope the clerics allow Rouhani to deliver what he dangled at election time. These principles of liberty tend to work, wherever they are applied. To paraphrase St Mungo, it’s time to let Iran flourish.

Hat-tip to Norman Lamont, who pointed out Rouhani’s celtic connections in the diary he recently wrote for us. Read it here. This blog is an updated version of one written before the result was finalised. And hat tip to Mark Eglington for the ‘Iran Brew’ caption.


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Show comments
  • ruru

    It is all lies, hanging and killing has been much more than Ahmadinijad ,hanging in the street front of children has been tripled since he became president… women do not have freedom in the street or any where else, since his election they pass a law that step father can marry his step daughter once she become 13 years old, Lack of human right is screaming in IRAN…. He is no moderate … He just lied with the big smiled on his face..

  • eric67

    “Glasgow has a sizeable Muslim population, and stands as one of Europe’s most successful examples of integration”

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/407931/Scots-police-smash-two-large-paedophile-rings

  • Augustus

    Rouhani’s real aim is not to alter the policies of the regime, but to present them in a better light (which includes their race to acquire nuclear weapons), so that Iran will be left alone by the international community. Rouhani represents just another opportunity for self-delusion.

  • Mandiaria

    Can u tell me how u know that he can speaks many languages? Unfortunately I could not find any source for that.

    Thnx

  • http://ekklesiafoundation.org.uk/ EkklesiaWarrior

    Wish Rouhani well in his attempts to reform Iran.

    I spoke in Glasgow over many years, between 1978-94. Sauchiehall Street very well not only good haggis but culture as well.

    However found the Islamist community one of more hostile in the UK.

  • Mahsa

    i am Iranian, living in Iran doesn’t mean that we are uncivilized or savage. we don’t ride camels. we have a very modern life ,we drive high class cars.we have many Educated and Gifted men. over 50% percent of Iranian are educated in universities inside and outside of Iran. but something that is different is government. i think being “made in Glasgow” doesn’t mean he is perfect because of university he is educated. we have many writers and philosophers not going to Glasgow or other universities outside of Iran. don’t merge Government and people pls.

    • Blorgh

      You make a good point that we should all bear in mind. I have met a lot of Iranians, and at most only one of them was what I might describe as a “radical”. Iran is a surprisingly modern and bright place for a country with an Ayatollah at the helm. I don’t think a Glasgow education matters one way or the other; there are enough domestically educated Iranians who could reform the country if only they were given the chance.

    • Augustus

      To an outsider in the West, the very essence of the Islamic Republic is the rule of one cleric hailing from the same line as the founder of the republic, Ayatollah Khomeini. Rouhani may be seen as a ‘moderate’, but he doesn’t belong to the Green Movement. People in Iran probably voted for him, not becauseof a sudden public faith in the political system, but because a moderate cleric poses at least a possible challenge to the office of the supreme leader. But the people there probably view this whole game of politics as utterly ridiculous, and rightly so. As one of the founders of the Islamic Revolution, and as a loyalist to Khomeini and his associates, Rouhani isn’t going to do anything that we would not expect of Khamenei himself, or Khomeini for that matter, anytime soon.

    • tizab12

      Yes, totally agree with you. Now that Brits are patting themselves and betting on the Rohani’s Glasgow University education, let’s see how quickly the Iranian Embassy in London will reopen. After all, that would be the first step in the line of improvement. But I guess that is not going to come about without the Brits fist have squeezed some substantial concessions out of Rohani. Of course, people’s say in those behind the scene bargaining and decision-takings is excluded when Dr. Rohani has to give in to the West’s illegitimate demands.
      However, as another Iranian I am going to give this President the benefit of my doubts and I congradulate his win and wish him well.

  • Augustus

    ‘Made in Glasgow’, showcased in Tehran. Iran’s ugly face for the past eight years, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, will now be replaced with a new promising figure that flashes a pleasant, reassuring smile. Khamenei could not have chosen a better deception. Rouhani has never been an active reformist, nor was he a member of the Green Movement that took to the streets in 2009. And unlike the reformist Mousavi, who was denied the presidency in 2009, he ‘s very much in Khamenei’s good books. It’s a pity that Iran is an alcohol-free country, otherwise after watching the election returns both Rohani and Khamenei could have sat together and celebrated with some of the best scotch available. Salvation, if it comes, won’t come from the ballot box, but from the people.

  • anneallan

    If he learned to speak English in Glasgow, how will we soft Southerners know whether he’s holding forth in Farsi or English?

  • billyzand

    the “clash of civilizations” narrative so beloved of the Iranian religious crackpots ”

    er, it was an American who developed the “clash of civilisations” thesis, and it is the anti-muslim crowd who have been most vociferous in using it’s (threadbare) analysis as motivation for imperialism.

  • mattmanhere

    Isn’t Glasgow Socialist

    • thistle

      It depends if you believe the current Labour party are socialist or not.

      Labour or Tory quote?

      “We were set up as the party to represent the values of working people, working being the key word. We weren’t set up as some sort of charity to help the poorest in society – the long-term unemployed, the benefit dependent, the drug addicted, the homeless.”

      Tom Harris MP Labour, Glasgow South

  • Maidmarrion

    messy piece ,sorry I wasted the minutes reading it.
    Some of the comments are more interesting and more logical.
    I am finding that comments are more enlightening/amusing/apposite than the opining of the churnalists.

  • Nick

    So do we refer to this bloke as Jock Hassan Rouhani?

  • christopher mahoney

    Iran is run by the IRG mafia. Nothing will change.

  • Augustus

    “Rouhani advocates equal rights for women, free trade (or the lifting of sanctions anyway) and limiting the state’s power to interfere in people’s private lives”

    But history will remember June 2009 as the time when change in Iran was possible but nothing was done. Presidents come and presidents go, but Ayatollah Khamenei, the heir to Ayatollah Khomeini, remains.

  • CHRISTOPHER WHITE

    you’re a democrat but you don’t believe your fellow countrymen should decide who should live in their countr don’t know if curry haggis explodes but the bombs that killed 54 people on 7.7 (maimed 200/300) did. I think you should devote any spare energies to PUSHING BACK

    • Blorgh

      What… was that?

  • David Lindsay

    So much for Iran’s not being a democracy. If this result is valid, then so was the last one.

    • Ulysses Returns

      Don’t be silly. Iran is no more a democracy than Zimbabwe, North Korea or Iraq was. It is a theocracy that only allows ‘acceptable’ candidates to stand for office. As for its validity, it’s their country and they can vote or not as they wish, but don’t call it democratic – that’s the vicabulary of the cold war and was debased by the Stalinists before we were born.

      • David Lindsay

        What a charming period piece. It took me back 10 years.

        • Ulysses Returns

          My fault for breaking my own rule and engaging with a lefty idiot. It’s like arguing with a bowl of soup. Out.

          • David Lindsay

            And again.

  • swatnan

    Thank goodness we’ve got a uni graduate from the intelligensia at the helm, a polymath and a polyglot. My only objection is that he is a cleric, so his view of the world may be a bit blinkered. But they say he’s a moderate, but in Iranian terms thats slightly right of Nigel Farage. Best not to mix religion and politics. I agree that The Enlightenment hit Scots well before the English who have still a lot of catching up to do.

    • allymax bruce

      Christianity, is the only ‘religion’, that doesn’t mix religion & politics. But Labour don’t care; Labour want to submerge our country with deadly religous immigrants; that are not Christian, and couldn’t give two foxx for us.

      • David Lindsay

        “Christianity doesn’t mix religion & politics”?

        I have heard it all now.

        It certainly does, and thank God that it does.

  • CraigStrachan

    “Those armed with a Scottish education have made excellent leaders of foreign countries”

    Hastings Banda?

  • Austin Barry

    Thomas Jefferson was of Welsh descent for Gawd’s sake. This from walesonline:

    “But now tests on two British men, who have the Jefferson surname, have shown they have an identical ‘K2’ section of DNA, which shows the US president does indeed have links with the UK.

    Experts believe this means the President’s claims of a Welsh ancestry are more than likely to be true.”

    http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/dna-tests-prove-jeffersons-welsh-2273078

  • http://owsblog.blogspot.com Span Ows

    he hasn’t won yet…and you can thank the English for the Scottish Enlightenment

    • southwood

      Oh, you mean the men of the Scottish Enlightenment were English ? News to me, pal. I think if you were fair minded (which I doubt) you would admit that England would not have become as great a country as it became without the contributions of Scotsmen. Anyway the things at the root of Scotland’s great achievements including the setting up educational establishments were the result of the Scottish Reformation, not the so called Enlightenment.

      • http://owsblog.blogspot.com Span Ows

        “Oh, you mean the men of the Scottish Enlightenment were English?”…writes Southwood.

        What? How do you possibly come to think I meant that? And I am well aware and impressed by the ‘above average’ contribution to Empire of many, many Scotsmen. You seem confused by something.

        • southwood

          You are quite right. It was just hyperbole. :)

  • Newsfox

    But Fraser all your pals want to bomb Tehran to kingdom come – which means it may yet come to resemble Glasgow…..

    • the viceroy’s gin

      …careful there, “Newsfox”, these bubble denizens may ban everybody else from engaging in the hunt, but they always make exception for themselves.

    • southwood

      So glad that you think Glasgow is a bombsite. That means we won’t be graced by your presence up here any time soon.

  • HookesLaw

    Your argument is shot to ribbons by Gordon Brown

  • ArchiePonsonby

    Ah’ll see YEW, Jimmeh, and I believe that Thomas Jefferson always considered himself of Welsh descent?

    • southwood

      Blame Wikipedia for the alleged inaccuracy.

  • Abhay

    The cheerleaders have come out a bit prematurely. Hold back the jubilation awhile.

  • Daniel Maris

    Correction no. 1: he’s not the “leader of his country”. The leader is Ayatollah Khamenei.

  • Eddie

    You’ll find similar fibs on the CVs of many pompous professionals. For example, George Al-Gallifrey even claims to be sane and fit to stand for mayor of London!
    I myself know 3 senior academics who claim to have gone to ‘university’ on their CV when in fact they went to polytechnics. Scratch the surface and you’ll find a veritable fib-fest below the glimmering sheen of the veneer of the paper-shuffling classes.
    Me, I didn’t go to a polytechnic, because I was in Nam. Cheltenham. Before I went to Oxford… (well I did go there, I promise…)

  • Slim Jim

    Yes, but is he a Catholic or Protestant cleric? Which team does he support? We need to know…

    • Eddie

      And is he bladdered in the photo? Looks pie-eyed to me. Maybe he imports buckfest to Iran specially…

    • southwood

      Surely you don’t want him to become sectarian ? LOL.

  • Arden Forester

    “He is a cleric and a polyglot, speaking English, German, French, Russian and Arabic.” But no Farsi? That won’t get him very far!

    • Alexsandr

      thats farcical…. :)

      • Daniel Maris

        On the contrary it did get him far – see!

    • ruru

      He speaks Farsi and Arabic… barely English .. That is the truth

  • Colonel Mustard

    Goodness me. Is the readiness to adopt foreigners who briefly studied in Scotland as “Glasgow men” indicative of the triumphalist chauvinism now rising within Salmond’s Kingdom? That smacks of Oxbridge elitism if not a curiously transatlantic fraternity ethos but I doubt that any English graduates of Scots seats of learning would be the recipients of such honours, certainly not judging by the QT 16/17 audience. We had one very clear demonstration of the barely suppressed Anglophobia which the SNP panellist did little to distance himself from.

    No-one has shouted Mr Nelson down and barricaded him in a pub in the Bubble have they?

    • the viceroy’s gin

      …no, and that omission needs addressing, as in the formation of “United Against Self Satisfied Twits Who Preen Against Fascism” (UASSTWPAF), to put the run on this guy.

  • eric67

    Associating Glasgow Caley with the “enlightenment ” is hilarious. The last I heard, Glasgow Caley didn’t make the top 100 UK university list in the TES. In fact the university is so good Strathclyde police won’t touch their IT graduates. Dream on Fraser.

    • CraigStrachan

      “Strathclyde police won’t touch their IT graduates”

      Except with a truncheon.

  • Ulysses Returns

    Is this your day for irony Fraser? “Those armed with a Scottish education have made excellent leaders of foreign countries”; except the last two leaders of this country you could have said. Let’s hope the current Scottish political trend for intolerance and little Scotlandism didn’t infect Rouhani.

    • Fraser Nelson

      FOREIGN countries, I said.

      • Ulysses Returns

        You are still not getting the irony Fraser. Keep up please.

      • allymax bruce

        Ultra-Left Labour political policies.
        Hotbed of Islamist fundamentalism.
        Scottish Enlightenment regressed.
        Bella Caledonia supports ultra-Left Radical Labour.
        ……..
        I can’t bear to watch; Ultra-Left Labour supports, fosters, and produces, the next leader of Iran. A hostile nation, that wants to make nuclear weapons, to wipe another nation ‘off the face of the Earth’.
        Like I say, I can’t bear to watch what the Ultra-Radical Labour Left will do next!

        • David B

          Iran would appreciate your anti simitic rants and conspiracy theories on Zionist world control.

          They must be “your” friends

      • Alexsandr

        I think you will find Scotland is a country, and Wales a principality.

        • Daniel Maris

          I think you’ll find the Welsh have always considered it a country. Principalities can be countries. Luxemburg is only a Grand Duchy.

          • Alexsandr

            Wales was subsumed into England by Edward 1, and until the Welsh assembly, was governed as part of England. Scotland always had a separate legal system, and joined the union voluntarily. it was a union not a conquering. (OK, they had little choice having bankrupted themselves with the Darien adventure)

            Saying Wales is a country (being a self governing unit) is not right IMHO as the Welsh Assembly only exists because the Westminster parliament allows it, and it can be revoked at any time. Remember the Welsh Assembly has no tax raising powers, just gets a block grant from Westminster. It is far less autonomous than Scotland or even Northern Ireland.

            • marhek

              Whereas the Celtic nation of Cornwall has never been formally subsumed into England and enjoys a unique constitutional status where its Head of State is not the Queen (God help us – it’s her flap-eared eldest son!). England, of course, claims Cornwall, but no legal documents to that effect exist.

      • pinkgunnergirl

        @fnelson123:disqus

        England is a FOREIGN Country.

    • southwood

      What about the current English trend for intolerance and little Englandism ? It’s growing.

  • Rhoda Klapp8

    Whereas Hong Kong may have been run on the principles of the Scottish Enlightenment, Glasgow is not.

    • Fraser Nelson

      yes, the great irony. Scotland adopted the illiberal principles of the French Enlightenment, and America (and, increasingly, Asia) adopted the principles of the Scottish Enlightenment.

      • Bert Hopkins

        Thats Scotland pigeonholed by Fraser then. Does Fraser and his little pals Andrew Neil and Iain Martin not note the contradictions of their illiberal liberalism. Of course not they are too busy writing tosh like the above.

      • alabenn

        Is that how Pol Pot became the most enlightened figure in the world.
        At last something to thank Scotland for.
        I seem to recall Idi Amin had a penchant for things Scottish as well.

      • allymax bruce

        You don’t know your Scottish Enlightenment. But why am I not surprised?

    • skulamus

      How true! Corrupt,dishonest and self serving. Let Glasgow City Council flourish.The electorate do, and they got what they voted for.

      • southwood

        GCC are an utter disgrace. It saddens me to say it, but my fellow Glaswegians, and other Scots, are leftist idiots in the main.

        • thistle

          Agreed about GCC. But what options does our “leftist idiots” have? Vote rightwing Labour or even more rightwing Tory. Just look at the state these bloody rightwing idiots have got the UK in. Utter disgrace indeed.

          • southwood

            You have it wrong. It’s the leftwing Tories and NuLabour that messed the UK up. The Tories are certainly not right wing, nor are they conservative. Scotland needs a centre right anti EU party and quick. They don’t seem to want Ukip whom they see as English Nats. Murdo Fraser had some idea of changing the Tories in Scotland into something else but it’s gone pear shaped. Scotland big mess.

    • southwood

      And it’s over 50 years since it was run on anything resembling the principles of the Scottish Reformation, if you get my drift.

    • thistle

      Indeed, or the pig trough of Westminster.

    • eric67

      “Glasgow has a sizeable Muslim population, and stands as one of Europe’s most successful examples of integration. ” Neither better or worse than anywhere else I suspect.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Kriss_Donald

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_Glasgow_International_Airport_attack

      http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/news/editor-s-picks/these-men-took-my-innocence-as-they-lured-me-into-a-sickening-world-of-abuse-1.1079252

      • southwood

        “Glasgow has a sizeable Muslim population, and stands as one of Europe’s most successful examples of integration”.

        That statement is not true. I live in Glasgow. The Muslim population here is much smaller than in comparable English cities or proportionately compared to other smaller cities. They have taken over Pollokshields. They are the majority, I believe, in East Woodlands. What I mean is they have their own areas. They live separately from the indigenous population. They are not integrating in any meaningful way. Muslims don’t integrate. It’s mandated by their religion.

        • JPJ2

          southwood

          Integrated enough to vote SNP.
          At one point the only SNP councillor in Glasgow was the SNP’s Bashir Ahmad (now deceased),, who later became the first Asian MSP at Holyrood.

          • southwood

            SNP ? The party of dis-integration. Muslims are not integrating with ordinary Scottish society. There’s no denying that.

          • eric67

            That was the same Ahmad that organized the protest against morning player assembly at the Scotland street school , and when asked what it meant for the SNP to win the first Scottish election in 2006. Ans : “All muslim schools”. The SNP faithfully obliged by funding the first muslim secondary in Scotland. Incidentally , no-one voted for Ahmad he is a product of the party machines and nominated for the List.

            • JPJ2

              eric 67

              “no one voted for Ahmad”
              Taken to its logical conclusion, without the current electoral system, parties other than the SNP would have been virtually wiped out-would you have preferred that? :-)

  • Raman Indian

    George Orwell hated Scots: he often crossed the road when he saw one coming.

    • Wessex Man

      So how did he know if they were Scots?

      • Ulysses Returns

        We are told ‘It is never difficult to tell the difference between a Scotsman with a grievance and a ray of sunshine’. If you want to know how much the Nats bear their grievances and hate us, last week’s QT may help in indentification, or go to The Scotsman online addition and read some of the comments – I would imagine the Nazis pre and post Kristallnacht were voicing similar views about their Jewish population. I fear that Scotland has become a no-go area for the English and I only hope we do not reciprocate here.

        • southwood

          Well, now, let’s look at it from the view of a Scotsman who’s just feeling a wee grievance now. I read regular disparaging remarks about how the Scots are this and that and good riddance to them next year etc. If anything it’s uglier than any Scottish anglophobia, and certainly fosters it. Get some balance, friend.

          • Blorgh

            If the English are saying “good riddance to them next year”, isn’t that because the Scots started clamouring for independence? Come on, you wouldn’t find such raw feelings in England today if it wasn’t for the independence movement.

            • southwood

              The hatred for the Scots which many English have is quite astounding. I cannot see how the clamour for independence by a MINORITY of Scots can suddenly create such feelings. These feelings must have been dormant, awaiting an excuse for their expression. In other words, many English want rid of us whether we Scots want independence or not. In fact I have seen opinion polls which show that a higher proportion of English want Scottish independence than the Scots do. I personally am against independence but the ugly English anti-Scottishness almost makes me change my mind at times. I am sure the anti-Scottish part of the English population realize that and are using it to stir ill feeling.

              • Colonel Mustard

                No, it’s because the English have long felt the brunt of Scots hostility whether light hearted or with an undercurrent of real hatred. The constant blame for all misfortunes, real or imagined, has long been there, bolstered by the sort of ripe mythology that characterises the ’45, for example, as pure English oppression and produces such gems of historical integrity as Braveheart.

                What you are seeing is a backlash exacerbated by the way Salmond and some Scots have gone about seeking their “independence”. When you are blamed and hated, then fellow countrymen in a supposed “union” demand independence from a Westminster parliament seen as being full of Scots politicians when there is already a dedicated Scots parliament it is difficult not to feel a trifle irritated and to retaliate.

                The hatred of the hostile young man in the QT audience was almost visceral and just reinforced the SNP “bitter together, better apart” hiss. But it is as well to remember that Scotland will secede from the United Kingdom, not from England and that England will still be left without its own parliament.

                • southwood

                  Oh, I suppose the English loved us all that time. Yeah, right. Visceral is the word to describe the hatred of some English for the Scots. I have seen it and I detest it. It’s not rational. It’s a tribal hatred. Try to excuse it all you want, it’s just sheer hostility. Based on petty vindictiveness.

                  “The constant blame for all misfortunes, real or imagined, has long been there…” Really, so why has it taken the Scots so long to want to separate (they still don’t) ? You obviously understand and empathise with the anti-Scottishness. I admit I understand anti-Englishness although I personally restrain it in myself since I believe in tolerance. Do you ?

                • Fergus Pickering

                  Oh come along. The English do not hate the Scots. They barely notice them most of the time. And it’s a nice place for a holiday.

                • southwood

                  Some of them undoubtedly do hate the Scots. With a passion. You too, perhaps ?

                • Colonel Mustard

                  I don’t excuse it I merely attempt to explain why it seems to be more apparent lately. But your first sentence says it all even without the paradox of your detestation of English hatred for Scots but your understanding of Scots hatred for the English. You are your own answer. A miserable wee man with a great big chip.

                  Personally I feel sad at the prospect of Scots independence having shared both comradeship and friendship with some very fine Scots under a shared flag.

                • southwood

                  You are the one with the chip, a type of Englishman I will never like. I am very tolerant, surrounded as I am here with many English people. Also I have many English friends. Never has any one of them said I had a chip. You are an embittered churl who hates the Scots.

                • Colonel Mustard

                  I think you must have me confused with someone you know!

                • Andy

                  Ah I see. You take great pride in your ‘tolerance’ and excuse your hate of England.

                • southwood

                  I don’t hate England or the English. Read my comments. I have friends who are English, some live down in England. However I am entitled to dislike those arrogant, churlish English who want to insult the Scots at every opportunity. Oh, the Scots have a chip, or they are subsidized by the English, or they want to break away. Some comments I have read on the back of that have been unbelievable, almost warlike in tone. No, I most certainly do not like those people, and, yes, it shows tolerance on my part in that I am courteous to each English person I meet. I take people as I find them. If you think tolerance means denying my feelings and not disliking certain people or their attitudes then you are asking a lot.

                • Andy

                  Perhaps you would do well to reflect that some of the attitudes amongst some English people are a reaction to the anti English rhetoric and attitude in Scotland. I know Scotland and I have a friend who is more Scottish than most Scots, but because she happens to speak with an English accent the level of anti English bigotry and hate she receives is frankly disgusting and a bloody disgrace. She wouldn’t get treated that way if she was black, or a Muslim, but she happens to be perceived, wrongly as it happens, to be English so that’s ok then. We English are just as entitled to ‘dislike those arrogant, churlish [Scots] who want to insult the [English] at every opportunity’.

                • southwood

                  Look, we can throw examples back and forward all day. It will get us nowhere. I don’t even believe it’s all or even for the most part political as some commenters on here are suggesting. It’s tribal. It’s human nature. Britain has cast off its Christian moral code. That had a restraining power over any dormant prejudices. So now we see these ugly attitudes rising to the surface. I don’t see it getting better, rather the opposite. We are all under the curse of God for the sins of the nation. I despise the GCC and Scottish Government for what they are doing to my Glasgow and Scotland. I despise Westminster for what it is doing to the UK. So called multiculturalism and diversity is destroying us. The nation, the UK, needs to turn to God and re-establish proper values or we will nose-dive at an ever faster rate. We are already under the heel of the EU. Soon we may be under the heel of shariah law.

                • allymax bruce

                  Sorry Col’, I got to Braveheart, and I couldn’t resist; Freeeeddoomm!

                • Colonel Mustard

                  It’ll be doom alright – but it won’t be free!

              • Blorgh

                It does not surprise me that you have seen such polls. Anglophone Canada sometimes gets very irritable about Quebec, giving rise to similar polls. But this irritability always seems to follow some nasty incident of anti-Canadian hostility in Quebec. Then the news fades away and tempers calm.

                • southwood

                  There is a segment of the English who want rid of the Scots whether the Scots want independence or not. In fact from some of the comments I have seen there are some English who would like to have the Scots exterminated.

              • allymax bruce

                Fundamentally, we are two completely different peoples, Nations, and animals.
                And, ignorant, stupid, & malicious articles, like this sneer-veneered cowpat, from Nelson, does him, & his ignorant sneering mates, no good what-so-ever.
                Vote Yes, and let’s all move on.

                • southwood

                  Oh, come on, you made some perceptive comments, and you want to vote “yes” for Salmond etc. ? Please reconsider. He will destroy Scotland. You sussed the EU but Salmond is in love with the EU.

                  On a lighter note I am listening to an introduction to some opera based on Walter Scott’s stories on radio three. The English announcer refers to the high landers (two words) instead of highlanders. LOL.

    • southwood

      Funny, then, that he settled in Jura for his latter years. Odd, to say the least…

      • marhek

        Yes, but the Coirevrechan whirlpool nearly had him!

        • southwood

          I don’t know about that but I believe his anti-Scottish prejudices fell off considerably when he moved up here and began to realize that we are human beings with our own problems. In fact, he actually came to blame the English (rightly or wrongly) for some of these.

          • Colonel Mustard

            The English are to blame for everything, everywhere. Even their own genocide.

            • southwood

              The Scots will rival the English in the self-genocide department. In fact the Swedes appear to be the front runners at the moment.

          • allymax bruce

            Good comment. Eric was ‘courted’ by the so-called ‘great & good’ of the British Empire; the same great & good that Saville Grade ‘knew’!
            The Cold War against Russia was ‘instituted’ to produce this pathetic excuse we have called the EU. And it was the same people that ‘managed’ that ‘plan’, as it is that are about to make continual war in the middle east. Eric knew this, and the

            • southwood

              Yes. Orwell is one of my favourite writers. He appears to have seen so much of today’s political nightmare coming. As for the Cold War being set up to create the EU, I reckon you could be right. The Nazis had a very similar blueprint for Europe. The hypocritical politicians, Obama, Hague, Cameron, and most of the Arabs want rid of Assad at any cost, even when they know it means arming al Qaeeda and thereby imposing (they hope) a shariah controlled state. Same as they did with Egypt and Libya. It’s beyond crazy. The Big Boys (Bilderbergers etc.) who pull the strings of these puppets are hedging us into a globalist totaltarian state.

  • weescamp

    Yes those of us that support Scottish independence have known for a long time that the principles of the Scottish Enlightenment will stand us in good stead and create an independent Scotland that will flourish economically and socially.

    • Robert_Eve

      The rest of us will celebrate the total lack of Scottish MPs in Westminister!!

    • http://owsblog.blogspot.com Span Ows

      the opposite, surely? Just as the Scottish Enlightenment was 100% down to the joining with England (OH YES) so to the probable collapse when it becomes independent again.

      • southwood

        Want to try and prove that ? No, thought not.

        • http://owsblog.blogspot.com Span Ows

          Nothing is more irritating than someone posing a question in a reply then answering themselves in the same comment. Looks stupid and, well, you get what it is.
          I have no comment on whether it was all good or not, not much, ever can be all good; however why should I try to prove it when it’s so evident?

          • southwood

            You, like so many of your fellow countrymen, are easily irritated, especially, it seems, by Scots. How is it so evident ? The Scottish Enlightenment emerged from the liberal society and fine education system the Scots had established. It was no way 100% down to union with England.

    • Colonel Mustard

      We’ll see. The EU might have a bearing on all that. You might find yourselves swopping an imaginary foreign master for a real one.

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