Blogs

Syrian rebels pledge allegiance to al-Qaeda, but promise to behave

11 April 2013

8:49 AM

11 April 2013

8:49 AM

This, from the BBC – just in case any further evidence were needed.

‘The leader of the al-Nusra Front, a jihadist group fighting in Syria, has pledged allegiance to the leader of al-Qaeda, Ayman al-Zawahiri.

Abu Mohammed al-Jawlani said the group’s behaviour in Syria would not change as a result.

Al-Nusra claims to have carried out many suicide bombings and guerrilla attacks against state targets. On Tuesday, al-Qaeda in Iraq announced a merger with al-Nusra, but Mr Jawlani said he had not been consulted on this.

Al-Nusra has been designated as a terrorist organisation by the US.

Debates among Western leaders over whether to arm Syria’s rebels have often raised the concern of weapons ending up in the hands of groups such as al-Nusra.

“The sons of al-Nusra Front pledge allegiance to Sheikh Ayman al-Zawahiri,” Mr Jawlani said in a recording released on Wednesday.

But Mr Jawlani said al-Nusra had not been consulted on the merger with al-Qaeda in Iraq and insisted his group would not change its stance in Syria.

Al-Nusra is aware that al-Qaeda is not a name to conjure with in Syria, which is presumably why it distanced itself from Tuesday’s merger announcement from the al-Qaeda leader in Iraq.

The al-Nusra statement assured Syrians that the “good behaviour” they had experienced from the front on the ground would continue unchanged.’

My favourite bit of the report is where they say they will continue their ‘good behaviour.’ I’m like, y’know, lol.

Also note: this is a ‘Jihadist group fighting in Syria’, rather than a crucial part of the rebel forces whom we are helping to fund and arm.


More Spectator for less. Stay informed leading up to the EU referendum and in the aftermath. Subscribe and receive 15 issues delivered for just £15, with full web and app access. Join us.



Show comments
  • http://twitter.com/awingeddemon Daemon

    How ironic after billions spent on the anti-terror decade, we now support the same people who flooded over the Iraqi border for 10 years, chainsawing and butchering people in a sectarian bloodbath, and now are supplied with weapons and aid AT THE UK TAXPAYERS expense to support ‘rebels’ who EAT CORPSES hearts on video and presumably will eventually wash up on the streets of London one day demanding their benefits and aid for their poor damaged minds. 1,2,3 aaaaaah.

  • Studley

    designated as a terrorist organisation

    That’s not English. One is designated something, without the adverb or whatever part of speech ‘as’ is known by.

    • Peter Crawford

      So you criticise somebody’s use of English despite being ignorant of what an adverb is. You should send a photo of yourself to the Oxford Illustrated Dictionary. They can use it to illustrate the phrase ‘silly c***’ .

      • Studley

        Happy now? Talk about rude: I was just pointing out a mistake, without insulting the person that made the mistake. That’s obviously beyond your capacity.

  • Noa

    Following Libya and Egypt the FCO’s links with Al Queda and islamic terrorism are becoming close and increasingly formalised.
    Perhaps we can offer them the services of Trident?

  • Augustus

    It can only get worse. Once Assad is gone there will be a second civil war which will make Iraq look pale in comparison. When the Gulf States, led by Saudi Arabia, encouraged the West to arm the Afghan mudjahedeen, Al-Qaida and the Taliban were born out of a so-called resistance. In this religious civil war, in which Sunni Muslim fundamentalists, paid and armed by Saudi Arabia and other Gulf States, are fighting Alawites and Shiite fundamentalists paid and armed by Iran, it will probably be left to the West to make those billion dollars available for humanitarian aid to Syria’s refugees and wounded, rather than the rich Gulf states. Because the opposition is only passionate about tyranny – their own tyranny.

    • MaxSceptic

      We should not send a sausage.

      • Noa

        We could send some nice pork ones…

        • anotherjoeblogs

          damn you beat me to it !

    • chan chan

      Assad ain’t going anywhere unless Russia, and to a lesser extent China, decide he is. Other than that, it’s business as usual.

    • Curnonsky

      Shades of the Spanish Civil War.

  • DougS

    “Syrian rebels pledge allegiance to al-Qaeda, but promise to behave”

    Yeah, right!

    • anotherjoeblogs

      like putting dracula in charge of a blood bank

  • Austin Barry

    Perhaps the SIS (MI6) should raise a ‘British Brigade’ of locals from Bradford, Luton, East London etc. to assist the rebels, much like the Spanish Civil War’s International Brigade.

    This may do nothing for the Syrian troubles, but would cull some of our domestic Jihadis. I shall contact Sir John Sawyers with the idea and, yes, I would accept a knighthood.

    • Hexhamgeezer

      Good idea. They can call themselves the 7/7s. Recruitment posters in !$lamic charity shops should obviate the need for EmEye 6 involvement.

    • DougS

      “….I shall contact Sir John Sawyers with the idea and, yes, I would accept a knighthood….”

      There’ll soon be one going spare from Sir (soon to be Mr) Jimmy Crosby ex of HBOS. Just a quick electronic transfer should do the trick.

      Sir Austin Barry – it’s got a ring to it, but I think that it would sound even better the other way round – just a suggestion!

      • Noa

        If Cathy Ashton merits a peerage then so does Sir Austin.

        The Duke de Barry, yes it has a ring to it. And £300 per diem for Austin’s pearls of wisdom to be tweeted to Coffee House from the somnolent benches of the Lords after lunch seems excellent value for money to me.

        • David Lindsay

          You can just apply to be in the House of Lords.

      • Daniel Maris

        Why can’t they just press a button and create millions of knighthoods, like they create pounds with Quantitative Easing. Then we can all have one.

    • David Lindsay

      Back in the days when New Labour was led by Tony Blair and the other lot was led by Michael Howard, deeply disillusioned former Cabinet Ministers from both sides implored me not to write, even in jest, that our most unaccomplished 16-year-olds should be conscripted directly into the Israeli Defence Force, on the grounds that, “if the wrong person reads that, then it will happen.” They were not joking.

    • MaxSceptic

      Some are already there. I do hope they become martyrs.

    • chan chan

      This is exactly what a number of middle eastern countries did during the 80s Afghan war with their imprisoned jihadists. Ayman al Zawahiri was let out of jail in Egypt with the fondest hope he would go on the jihad and be killed. He went on the jihad like a good little Islamic maniac, but unfortunately, he survived.

  • edlancey

    It almost defies belief that William Hague seems ever keener to tool up the “rebels”. It’s difficult not to conclude that he is acting at the behest of Obama who, as ever, is too busy partying to do anything other than ‘lead from behind’, and he is developing quite the track record in supporting jihadis who want to overthrow governments.

  • laurence

    The Middle East is a quagmire we would do well to extricate ourselves from but we cannot because we need the oil. Were it not for our addiction to petro-chemicals, we could leave these little sh!tholes to the obscurity that they enjoyed before the 20th century. Hood above is correct. Let them get on with it.

    • edlancey

      It’s really only post-1973 when Nixon insanely gave in to the OPEC blackmail.

      We need to get fracking, and in a few years we can leave them to foul their own nests for the next thousand years.

    • David Lindsay

      Nuclear power. And coal.

      Only one party is committed to both. Or even to either. The only party linked to the trade unions.

      • laurence

        David, I have no problem with either of the energy sources you mention but whilst both are of use in satisfying domestic and industrial fuel demands, it is not clear to me how they can wean us from oil and, more specifically, petrol. It is, I’m sure you would concede, a little difficult to convert a car to run on nuclear power. Coal, perhaps, though it would make refuelling awfully messy and of course the Greens would weep into their alfalfa shakes about the emissions.

        • David Lindsay

          They wouldn’t be in government by then, unlike now. James Delingpole has an awful lot to answer for, having convinced his followers that the Left-Right split is the exact opposite of the real way round. But then, the Right has pulling off that same trick over the EU for 20 years.

          The solution is a return to British culture rather than younger sibling-style tagging along with American culture as depicted on popular television. A return to the railways, which were designed for this country and are especially suitable to it, and which can be run on electricity that in turn can be generated from nuclear power and from our vast reserves of coal.

          • laurence

            David, James Delingpole is a loon and there is absolutely no need for his presence in the midst of this conversation. I am, to be clear, all for coal and nuclear power, but these are of use in warming houses or generating electricity. They do not run motor cars or aeroplanes nor do they provide the plastics that are everywhere present. Again, for those of us who live in the countryside many miles from railway stations and with an infrequent bus service, what is the alternative to the car? Your depictions of British and American culture orbit a point I fail to see but I wholeheartedly endorse a return to the railways provided, that is, they are first re-nationalised. Interestingly, a steam train can get itself through snow drifts as they did in the terrible winter shortly after WWII: electric trains seem to struggle even on a sunny day.

            • David Lindsay

              I also live in the countryside. And our bus service has just been cut dramatically. But most people in Britain have not lived out here in 200 years. That was why we invented the railways. And yes, they certainly ought to be back in public ownership. Here on the East Coast Main Line (my nearest station is Durham), they are again, but this idiot Government was a third failed attempt at privatisation.

            • http://ajbrenchley.com/ Swank

              Delingpole is anything but a loon. He is not the most courteous man to grace the planet, but David Lindsay clearly doesn’t know the first thing about him. Also, the ‘Right’ he refers to is risible: Britain doesn’t have a ‘Right’, by any stretch of the imagination. At best it has a load of wets, who have allowed the Left to demonize them for two generations, and that’s it. I never self-identify as ‘Right’ because I’m not, nor are most other Britons that are non-Left: we’re classical liberals, more or less. I find the politics of truly Right-wing parties abhorrent. People like D. Lindsay find ‘the Right’ a handy term for any people that don’t agree with them.

            • Studley

              Delingpole is anything but a loon. He is not the most courteous man to grace the planet, but David Lindsay clearly doesn’t know the first thing about him. Also, the ‘Right’ he refers to is risible: Britain doesn’thave a ‘Right’, by any stretch of the imagination. At best it has a load of wets, who have allowed the Left to demonize them for two generations, and that’s it. I never self-identify as ‘Right’ because I’m not, nor are most other Britons that are non-Left: we’re classical liberals, more or less. I find the politics of truly Right-wing parties abhorrent. People like D. Lindsay find ‘the Right’ a handy term for any people that don’t agree with them.

  • chan chan

    The most important thing for us to do with respect to Syria is nothing. Absolutely nothing.

    • MaxSceptic

      Amen!

      • chan chan

        As Henry Kissinger said, “it’s a shame they both can’t lose”.

        • Kev Cooper

          and I bet he wishes he never said it. it’s quoted by everyone to make the same point, it’s been quoted twice in this comments section

  • zanzamander

    Though I don’t agree with him on many things, this is what George Galloway warned David Cameron about in the parliament not that long ago, that we’re helping the Jihadis (GG’s words).

    If we’ve learnt anything from the recent past than it is this: no matter what we do or don’t do, we’ll get the blame – not the Arab League, not Islam, not other Muslim countries, no, it will be us getting the kick in the teeth, again and we’ll end up paying billions in bribes, just like we’re doing with Pakistan and Afghanistan.

    We never learn.

    • chan chan

      They’re not bribes, they’re jizya. The doctrinally mandated transfer of wealth from non-muslims to muslims. And we’re gladly handing it over.

      • zanzamander

        Didn’t want to use that word, just in case Mods are too sensitive to a bit of truth.

        • chan chan

          Yes, just like the rape/pimping gangs of northern England, full of, ahem, “men”, according to the BBC, whose victims happen to be only non-muslim females. Ever.

          • James Strong

            Here we go again: it is not just the BBC.

            • chan chan

              Yes, it’s not just the BBC. Simply the first one that came out. Change to “most of the media”.

              No need to get overexcited, now…

  • Hood

    I know that this makes me a bad person, but why don’t we just let them get on with it?

    • MaxSceptic

      Indeed. As the sainted Henry K once said of the Iran-Iraq War: “It’s a pity both sides can’t loose”. Ideally they’ll fight among themselves (Shias and Alawites against Sunnis, religious against secular, maybe even Hezbollah (Iran-sponsored pro-Assad Shias) against Hamas (Muslim Brotherhood Sunnis now not-so-friendly-with-one-time-benefactor-Assad) — until there is none left standing. Inshallah!

      • ProffessorPlum

        ” until there is none left standing.”

        And then who will there be to resist Israel’s illegal expansion and land theft

        • anotherjoeblogs

          prof plum in the hamas office with a rope

          • MaxSceptic

            ….towed behind a motorcycle?

            • anotherjoeblogs

              ….towed behind a motorcycle while miss scarlett gets hassle from the morality police for not covering up.

        • Studley

          I’m sure they act with great legality. But so what? Anyone can make laws: I’m sure the psychotic Hussein family did, in Iraq. There are laws in Castro’s sad and desperate Cuba, and laws in bonkers North Korea (which is, if anything, even more desperate).

          I love it when the Left cries out about illegality — while sanctioning the undermining of every constitution, when they think they are above the law. Juvenile on the one hand and vicious on the other.

          • ProffessorPlum

            “I’m sure they act with great legality.”

            You are sure who acts with great legality?

            And what are you basing your assurance on?

            • Studley

              Missing the point and chasing one of your own devising, as Lefties usually do.

              • ProffessorPlum

                “Missing the point”

                The point was you said: “”I’m sure they act with great legality.””

                could you clarify who you mean by ‘they’ and why you are sure ‘they’ are acting legally?

                http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=111379908

                • Kev Cooper

                  “could you clarify who you mean by ‘they’ and why you are sure ‘they’ are acting legally?” Typical leftie crap, pick on a word and keep hammering home until everyone else is bored and leaves, then claim victory. They are like those little dogs that won’t stop humping your leg

Close
Can't find your Web ID? Click here