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Blogs

Abu Qatada’s victory proves how low we have been laid

13 November 2012

6:35 AM

13 November 2012

6:35 AM

For years a collection of politicians and commentators said that the ECHR and ECtHR would have no impact on British justice. Then they said that they would have no negative impact on British justice. Then it was said that while they might have some negative impact on British justice this would be out-weighed by the good done. Now some say that though the good may be outweighed by the bad the ECHR and ECtHR are still worth something anyway.

They, and we, should be plain. It no longer matters what the British government or Home Secretary wants. It no longer matters what the British courts want. It no longer matters what the British public wants. Because the Prime Minister, Home Secretary, Parliament, British courts and British people no longer have power in this country. Of course they retain all the titles, trappings and pretence of power. But they no longer actually hold power.

There could not be a clearer open-and-shut case than Qatada. He came to this country illegally and is wanted in his native country to face terrorism charges. Yet here he stays. Because thanks to the European Convention and European Court, Britain is no longer in control of itself or its future. When you consider how this happened, how disgracefully it was dissembled, and how helpless and pointless all our politicians have become in the face of it, you do wonder what must happen before we admit the pass we have been brought to and finally divorce ourselves from this illegitimate Convention and Court.

Subscribe to The Spectator today for a quality of argument not found in any other publication. Get more Spectator for less – just £12 for 12 issues.


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