Coffee House

The exciting new sub-committee on the block

5 September 2012

5 September 2012

Downing Street is very keen to emphasise that the key theme of this reshuffle is ‘implementation’. It’s an exciting word, I know, but the excitement has just ratcheted up a notch with the creation of a new sub-committee called the Growth Implementation Committee.

The GIC will sit under the economic affairs committee and will be chaired by the Chancellor (who also chairs the economic affairs committee). His deputy chair will be Vince Cable, which the Business Secretary will probably not appreciate, except when the Chancellor is away and he is able to take over. It will also include some of the faces of the reshuffle: David Laws will be a member, as will Ken Clarke in his new roving economic brief in the Cabinet Office. Oliver Letwin and Danny Alexander are also confirmed members, while other ministers leading on key growth areas such as housing, infrastructure and deregulation are also expected to attend.

The whole point of this committee, apart from the obvious joy that any new committee can bring to the life of a minister, is to ensure that the measures that have already been introduced are now being implemented properly. When the Prime Minister’s spokesman explained the reason for the GIC at lobby this morning, he named reforms such as planning which had already been implemented. Of course, those with a keen eye on the government’s economic prowess will point out that there’s a lot more still to do in terms of deregulation, planning reform and aviation policy. The committee will presumably not discuss any new reforms, given its focus on implementation, which makes it even less exciting than it sounds. Let’s hope Ken Clarke doesn’t fall asleep.


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  • Hexhamgeezer

    Cameron and Ossy have failed badly once again. What is the point of the GIC if you don’t have a sub-sub committe ensuring that the GIC does in fact ensure that action is taken on EAC matters. I realise that this is unlikely given that the GIC members are a stellar collection of energetic driven individuals who have done so much to turn this country round.

  • Hexhamgeezer

    Cameron and Ossy have failed badly once again. What is the point of the GIC if you don’t have a sub-sub committe ensuring that the GIC does in fact ensure that action is taken on EAC matters. I realise that this is unlikely given that the GIC members are a stellar collection of energetic driven individuals who have done so much to turn this country round.

  • Nicholas

    Committees and implementation are not the most obvious of bedfellows. Still perhaps some of the Common Purpose graduates in the cabinet can get cracking to “lead beyond authority” in this post-democratic age. Growth, I fear, will be as bidden as Canute bid the waves.

  • dalai guevara

    Liked the whole idea, until you mentioned the magic word that means different things to different people: deregulation.

  • A_Libertarian_Rebel

    Lining up for a replay of the 1970s’ Shirley Williams idea of Heaven on the Railways: the trains are infrequent, unpunctual, crowded, filthy, appallingly-staffed & unprofitable, but the Operators-Users Liaison Committee meets productively & frequently with great success.

  • John_Page

    The guff about this phase of governing being the implementation phase is tripe. Grant Shapps said today on Daily Politics that the govt made plans and got the legislation through, and now it’s time to deliver the legislation.

    Right. So Owen Paterson’s there to deliver Caroline Spelman’s agenda?

  • Bandmomma

    To err is human– to completely foul things up takes a government committee

  • http://www.coffeehousewall.co.uk/ Coffeehousewall

    The intention is not to achieve anything. Modern politics is not about achieving anything other than preserving the power and access to wealth and influence of those engaged in politics. This is a virtual committee playing virtual politics in a virtual world which is no more connected to reality than if it were an internet gaming world.

    • Frank P

      The last act on the deck of the Titanic (or in this case, HM Good Ship Great Britain) – a ‘meeting of the comm-itt-eeh’?

      The agenda, “WTF was that!?” (Vide famous last words of the Mayor of Hiroshima).

      GIC? “Goons in Control”.

  • Robert_Eve

    Let’s hope Ken Clarke does fall asleep.

    • James102

      If he does Labour will lose a member.

      • http://www.coffeehousewall.co.uk/ Coffeehousewall

        It really doesn’t matter. Labour and Conservative are terms that have no meaning whatsoever. Does Labour stand for increased debt and spending? Oh look! So does Conservative. Does Labour stand for high immigration? Oh look! So does Conservative. Does Labour stand for EU integration? Oh look! So does Conservative.

        These are meaningless terms. There are no parties. It is all part of the fiction. We have a totalitarian Government that is disguised (not very convincingly at all) as a democracy. This is why the four new women MPs presented as the future of Conservatism are all ex-Labour supporters. It doesn’t matter. We are not expected to notice. They don’t care if we notice. What are you going to do! – they say.

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